November 30, 2009

1921 Canadian Census Possible Release Date 2013

There have been many questions on mailing lists recently about the Canadian 1921 census release date. It appears we will have to wait until 2013 because according to Library and Archives Canada

Census returns after 1916 are in the custody of Statistics Canada, not Library and Archives Canada. The records are closed under the Statistics Act and the Act to Amend the Statistics Act.

The legislation does not permit the disclosure of personal information from post-1916census returns. Under the legislation, when 92 calendar years have elapsed since the taking of a census, those records will be opened for public use and transferred to Library and Archives Canada.

November 29, 2009

Reminder to Readers

Just a reminder to readers ---

On Monday Nov. 23rd I posted this announcement:

This post is a little different from my usual blog postings. I wanted to let readers know that tomorrow morning I am going for surgery and expect to be in hospital for about one week.

I've set up a few blog posts to publish automatically while I'm in hospital, but please be aware that for the next week or two, there will be fewer postings than usual.

As soon as I am able, I'll be back up and at it, and will resume daily genealogy articles, tips and announcements.


I'm still not available to write for the blog so please bear with me!

November 28, 2009

South Davis Regional Family History Fair

The South Davis Regional Family History Fair is one of Utah's largest and best genealogy fairs. The fair is held annually at Bountiful High School. The date of the next fair will be:

Saturday, March 6, 2010

The South Davis Regional Family History Center
3350 South 100 East
Bountiful, Utah 84010
(801) 299-4239

For more information, see: http://www.familyhistoryfair.com

November 27, 2009

25th annual Salt Lake Christmas Tour

Do You Want to Make Gigantic Leaps in Locating Your Ancestors?

Do you have brick-wall problems in your genealogy research?

If so - plan on joining the 25th annual Salt Lake Christmas Tour to the Family History Library this December.

Why December? Early December is an ideal time to come to the Family History Library. The library isn't crowded, as it is at other times of the year. The festivities in Salt Lake City are underway and the Christmas Tour Family is waiting with open arms for you to join them.

By joining us in Salt Lake City on a Salt Lake Christmas Tour, you will be in the right place - at the right time - to locate more ancestors than you may have ever found before.

Details and Registration Form (PDF)

November 26, 2009

Lorine is doing great

Hi All. This is Lorines hubby. Lorine is doing great and they are sending her home tomorrow. I thing she will be back bloging in no time :)

2010 OGS Family History Writing Contest

Do you have a great story about your family? Any stories of struggles, immigration, or “black sheep”? That story may be a winner.
Why not share it in 2500 words or less.

The Oklahoma Genealogical Society’s (OGS) Family History Writing Contest provides the
opportunity for researchers to share special family stories with fellow genealogists. The stories may be historically or ethnically important, humorous, or just plain interesting. Writing a family history story will preserve that precious memory and history for descendants.

There is no entry fee for the contest, and membership in OGS is not required although dues are a low $20 per calendar year for an individual or $25 for family memberships at the same address. Meetings are held the first Monday of each month at the Oklahoma History Center, with a speaker on some area of interest to genealogists. Members receive the OGS Quarterly and are invited to submit free queries as well as receiving a discount on workshops, seminars and other events.

Eligibility:

All family historians and genealogists, except OGS Board members, are invited to submit their favorite story for the contest. There is no entry fee and membership in OGS is not required.

There will be two divisions: Adult and Student. If enough entries are received, the student category will be divided into elementary and high school divisions.

Rules:
Stories must be typed in a standard font (not italic or script), double-spaced on one side of standard letter-size 8.5" x 11" paper, which prints about 250 words per page. Entries must be a maximum of 2500 words, plus attachments.

Story title and page number must be shown in upper right corner of each page.

The entry form includes the story title, your name, your mailing address, email address and phone, approximate word count, and whether entering the Adult or Student category. The entry form will be used to identify and notify the winners when manuscripts are returned from judging.

Indicate that you have researched the events by citing your sources as footnotes or endnotes, and attach copies (not originals) of the documentation, which is not included in word count.

Family group sheets and pedigree charts should be included if pertinent (also not included in word count)

Stories must be original and unpublished at time of entry.

Include a Stamped Self Addressed Envelope (SASE) if you wish your manuscript and the judge’s comments (if any) to be returned to you.

Submit entry form with four (4) copies of your story at the December, January or February OGS meeting registration desk, or by US mail postmarked by January 30, 2010 (sooner is better) to:
OGS Family History Writing Contest
P. O. Box 12986
Oklahoma City, OK 73157

For full details and a downloadable entry form, visit the Oklahoma Genealogical Society’s web site at http://www.okgensoc.org/.

November 25, 2009

NARA Workshop in Waltham Massachusetts

The National Archives in Waltham Massachusetts is offering a free public workshop, "Census, Passenger Lists, & Naturalization Records" on Dec. 1 at 2:00 p.m. This workshop will teach researchers how to utilize the free public records at the site to research their family histories.

It is geared to both novice and experienced family historians.

The National Archives in Waltham is one of 14 regional facilities where the public has access to Federal archival records.

To register for the workshop, send an email to waltham.archives@nara.gov

November 23, 2009

Lorine will be away for a bit.....

This post is a little different from my usual blog postings. I wanted to let readers know that tomorrow morning I am going for surgery and expect to be in hospital for about one week.

I've set up a few blog posts to publish automatically while I'm in hospital, but please be aware that for the next week or two, there will be fewer postings than usual.

As soon as I am able, I'll be back up and at it, and will resume daily genealogy articles, tips and announcements.

November 21, 2009

Naturalization Records, the often overlooked way to find a Ships Passenger List

We all want to know where our ancestors came from. We want to know when they arrived in North America and when they became citizens. Naturalization and immigration records are the answer. Sometimes naturalization records for an ancestor are the only way to discover the family origins and that all-important ships passenger list.


Naturalization records can help you find the date of immigration, ship's passenger list, port of arrival, and the place of birth for your ancestor. Some naturalization records include occupations, names and ages of minor children, names and birth dates and places of spouses --- and more!

Footnote.com has searchable Naturalization Recordsicon from NARA (National Archives).

There is a wealth of genealogical information just waiting for you in your search for an ancestor. The following examples of various American Naturalization Documents shows you what type of information you might find. You can view these actual American Naturalization Record Documents at NaturalizationRecords.com website

* 1795 Petition for Naturalization for Patrick Ryan in Pennsylvania
* 1906 Petition for Naturalization for Christopher Alt in Baltimore Maryland. Gives occupation, date and place of birth, date of immigration, port of departure and port of arrival, names of children plus dates and locations of births
* 1912 Petition for Naturalization for Jacob Imfang of Pittsburg Pennsylvania. Gives occupation, date and place of birth, date of immigration, port of departure and port of arrival, name of spouse, names of children plus dates and locations of births
* 1880 Naturalization Certificate includes name, age, country of origin
* 1891 Naturalization Certificate with name, date, country of origin
* 1922 Naturalization Certificate with name, age, physical description, wife's name, children's names and ages, country of origin
* 1925 Naturalization Certificate with name, age, physical description, wife's name, children's names and ages, current address, country of origin
* 1941 Naturalization Certificate with photo, name, age, physical description, marital status, country of origin, current address
* 1832 Declaration of Intent includes name, birthplace, age, settlement location
* 1846 Declaration of Intent for Daniel Stinger. Provides name of ancestor, current residence, age, country of origin,
* 1895 Declaration of Intent for Thomas Jones. Gives name, age, occupation, place and date of birth, physical description, current residence, name of ship sailed on, date of immigration, port of departure, port of arrival, last residence, marital status,
* 1937 Declaration of Intent for Pinchos aka Phillip Goldstein. Includes ancestor name, residence, occupation, physical description, race, nationality, place of birth, date of birth, name of spouse, place and date of marriage, Date and place of spouse's birth, year and port of immigration of spouse, current residence of spouse, number and names of children, location and dates of birth of children, year of immigration of ancestor, name of ship sailed on, port of departure, port of arrival, previous residence, actual name at immigration, and photograph

November 19, 2009

OVER 1.8 MILLION NATIVE AMERICAN RECORDS RELEASED ON FOOTNOTE.COM

-Original records dating back to early 1700s become available on the Internet for the first time-

Lindon, UT – November 19, 2009 – Footnote.comicon announced today the release of their latest interactive collection of historical records: the Native American collection. Working together with the National Archives and Allen County Library, Footnote.com has created a unique collection that will help people discover new details about Native American history.

The Footnote Interactive Native American Collection features original historical documents including:

· Ratified Indian Treaties – dating back to 1722

· Indian Census Rolls – featuring personal information including age, place of residence and degree of Indian blood

· The Guion Miller Roll – perhaps the most important source of Cherokee genealogical research

· Dawes Packets – containing original applications for tribal enrollments

· And other documents relating to the Five Civilized Tribes

Footnote’s Native American microsite creates an interactive environment where members can search, annotate and add comments to the original documents. Additionally, visitors can view pages for many of the Native American tribes that include historical events on a timeline and map, a photo gallery, stories and comments added by the community.

“Much like putting a puzzle together, Footnote.com brings pieces together in the form of historical documents to create a more vibrant picture of the events and people of the past,” says Justin Schroepfer, Marketing Director at Footnote.com. “Together with the online community we are discovering a side of history that you cannot find in text books.”

Footnote.comicon also provides a free service where visitors can create their own web pages for their Native American family. “Native Americans have a rich oral history,” explains Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “We hope that the online community will use Footnote Pages to preserve these stories, which will help ensure that they do not become lost to future generations.”

Visit the Native American Collection to see how Native American history has become an interactive experience.

November 17, 2009

January 11-15, 2010 – Salt Lake City, Utah

The Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG) will be held at the downtown Radisson Hotel. The following courses are planned:

Course 1 = American Records and Research: Focusing on Families
Course 2 = Mid-Atlantic Research (New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.)
Course 3 = Scottish Research
Course 4 = Central and Eastern European Research
Course 5 = Immigrant Origins
Course 6 = Computers and Technology
Course 7 = Advanced Genealogical Methods
Course 8 = Producing a Quality Narrative
Course 9 = American Land and Court Records
Course 10 = Problem Solving
Course 11 = Accreditation and Certification Preparation
Course 12 = U.S. Military

UGA Member SLIG Course Registration fees: $280 by 16 Nov 2009, thereafter $305.
Non-UGA Member SLIG Course Registration fees: $320 by 16 Nov 2009, thereafter $345.

For more information, see http://www.infouga.org

November 16, 2009

Dutch American Heritage Day

Do you have Dutch ancestry? Dutch-American Heritage Day is on November 16. My Dutch ancestry can be seen on the New Netherland section of Olive Tree Genealogy website. New Netherland was owned by the Dutch, then sold to the English and became New York, so if your ancestors were early settlers in that State, you too may have Dutch ancestry.

Following is the official proclamation of President Bush, declaring November 16 1991 as Dutch-American heritage Day. Since that time November 16 has been celebrated by the US-Dutch community.

DUTCH-AMERICAN HERITAGE DAY, 1991
By the President of the United States of America, George Bush
A Proclamation

On November 16, 1776, a small American warship, the ANDREW DORIA, sailed into the harbor of the tiny Dutch island of St. Eustatius in the West Indies.


Continue reading at http://thehague.usembassy.gov/

November 15, 2009

Belgian Red Star Line Museum looking for emigrant photographs, memorabilia & stories

Between 1873 and 1934 the legendary shipping company Red Star Line transported more than two million passengers to . Poor European emigrants in search of the American Dream, but also affluent passengers travelling for business or pleasure left for . They departed from the city of Antwerp (Belgium, ), where the port warehouses of the Red Star Line were situated.

To this day those Red Star Line warehouses are preserved. For many passengers they represented the last stop on the European mainland. It was there that, just before their departure, the emigrants travelling in third class underwent a medical examination and were disinfected, while clerks scrutinized their documents.

The Red Star Line buildings are protected monuments. They are part of the communal memory of innumerous new Americans. They had long been standing empty and were pleading for a new purpose. In the spring of 2012 the new Red Star Line Museum | People on the Move will open its doors at this historic location. It will be a place of remembrance, experience, debate and research into international mobility, both past and present. The story of Red Star Line and its passengers will be brought to life once more.

Do you have any old Red Star Line items such as postcards, luggage, diaries or photos? Are there travel stories or objects preserved in the family archive? Maybe you too can contribute to the new museum collection. Send an e-mail to redstarline@stad.antwerpen.be or call (+32)3 206 03 50. Perhaps your family item will find its way into the future museum… All tips are welcome!

More information at http://www.redstarline.be

November 12, 2009

Free US Military Records on Ancestry Until Nov. 13th

Press Release from Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Publishes for the First Time Online Collection of Twentieth-Century Navy Records

Site Celebrates Veterans Day with Free Access to Entire U.S. Military Records Collection

PROVO, UT (Nov. 11, 2009) – Ancestry.com today added more than 600 Navy cruise books to its online collection of military records to commemorate Veterans Day. This historic effort is the result of an agreement between Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online resource for family history, and the United States Navy. As part of the agreement, Ancestry.com set up scanners on location at the Navy Department Library in Washington, DC, and has spent several months digitizing the cruise books for this occasion.

The collection of Navy cruise books, available exclusively online at Ancestry.com, represents nearly 40 years of cruises following World War II (1950-1988) and chronicles an estimated 450,000 servicemen deployed at sea during that time. Styled after yearbooks, the cruise books include the names and photographs of individuals who served aboard the ship and highlight not only significant milestones that took place during the cruise, but also the day-to-day life on board ship. While not every Navy cruise was documented in a cruise book, the Navy Department Library has on file an estimated 3,500 cruise books, which Ancestry.com plans to digitize and add to this collection over time.

“When Ancestry.com approached the Navy about digitizing these cruise books for online access, we were thrilled,” said Captain Charles Todd Creekman, Jr., USN (Ret.) Executive Director of the Naval Historical Foundation. “A cruise book offers an insider’s perspective into what these sailors experienced, and the strong camaraderie they established, while serving their country at sea.”
The Navy cruise books are part of Ancestry.com’s U.S. Military Collection, which includes 100 million names that span more than three centuries of American military service.

“When you have a family member who has served in the Armed Forces, you can’t help but be proud,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com. “This Veterans Day, we’re celebrating America’s military heroes of yesterday and today and invite every American with military roots to see if they can learn something new about their family member on Ancestry.com.”

In honor of America’s military heroes, the entire U.S. Military Collection on Ancestry.com can be searched free through Nov. 13.

November 11, 2009

Remembering....

Many of my family have served in the military. Today I remember and thank them:

My father cecil McGinnis was a Lieutenant in WW2.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


His brother Clare also served in the Canadian Army.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



My grandfather Charles Fuller was in the Buffs in Kent England.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


My grandmother's brother Ernest Simpson was also in the Buffs and in the Canadian Army in WW1.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


My other grandmother's brothers (photo is her youngest brother Philip Edgar Peer who was killed during WW1) all served in the Canadian Army


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

James Simpson, my great-grandfather's brother, served in WW1 in England

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


My son is currently in the Canadian Military.

November 10, 2009

African American Funeral Programs available 1933-2008

And another announcement from the Digital Library of Georgia!

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the availability of a new online resource: African American Funeral Programs from the East Central Georgia Regional Library at http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/funeral.

The African American Funeral Programs from the East Central Georgia Regional Library online collection consists of over one thousand funeral programs ranging from 1933 to 2008 (with the bulk of the collection beginning in the 1960s) from the Eula M. Ramsey Johnson Memorial Funeral Program Collection. A majority of the programs are from churches in Augusta, Georgia, and the surrounding area, with a few outliers in other states such as New York and Florida. The programs typically contain a photograph of the deceased, an obituary, a list of surviving relatives, and the order of service. The collection provides extensive genealogical information about the deceased, including birth and death dates, maiden names, names of relatives, past residences, and place of burial. Alongside this genealogical information, the obituaries provide a rich source of local history about African Americans. Many of the people included in this collection were prominent in their communities, and many were involved locally in the struggle for civil rights.

Additional digitization projects are currently underway and will be announced as they become available online at the Digital Library of Georgia. Based at the University of Georgia Libraries, the Digital Library of Georgia is an initiative of GALILEO, the state's virtual library.

The African American Funeral Programs from the East Central Georgia Regional Library is a project of the Digital Library of Georgia in association with the East Central Georgia Regional Library as part of Georgia HomePLACE. The project is supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

For more information, please contact them at http://www.galileo.usg.edu/contact/.

November 9, 2009

Digital Library of Georgia brings 3 Georgia newspapers online!

Press Release follows

The Digital Library of Georgia is pleased to announce the free online availability of three historic Georgia newspapers: the Macon Telegraph Archive, the Columbus Enquirer Archive, and the Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive. Each extensive archive provides historic newspaper page images that are both full-text searchable and can be browsed by date. Zooming and printing capabilities are provided for each page image (via a DjVu browser plug-in).

The Macon Telegraph Archive (http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/telegraph) offers online access to weekly, daily, and semi-weekly issues under various titles spanning the years 1826 through 1908, and includes over 51,000 page images.

The Columbus Enquirer Archive (http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/enquirer) provides online access to weekly, daily and tri-weekly issues under various titles spanning the years 1828 through 1890. The archive includes more than 32,000 page images.

The Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive (http://dlg.galileo.usg.edu/milledgeville) offers online access to eleven historic newspaper titles spanning the years 1808 through 1920 (including the Civil War years when Milledgeville was the state capitol). The archive includes over 49,000 page images.

Additional newspaper digitization projects are currently underway and will be announced as they become available online at the Digital Library of Georgia. Based at the University of Georgia Libraries, the Digital Library of Georgia is an initiative of GALILEO, the state's virtual library.

The Columbus Enquirer Archive, Columbus Enquirer Archive, and Milledgeville Historic Newspapers Archive are projects of the Digital Library of Georgia as part of the Georgia HomePLACE initiative. The projects are supported with federal LSTA funds administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services through the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

For more information, please contact us at http://www.galileo.usg.edu/contact/.

November 6, 2009

Updates from Newspaper Archive

One of the many things I like about NewspaperARCHIVE.com is that you can get e-mail updates when new articles are added to the archive matching your search criteria.

I'm always searching for VOLLICK and FOLLICK anywhere, anytime in North America. So it's a challenge for me to remember what I've searched and where (and which individual!). So the email notification of new articles with my surnames of interest is a huge advantage and help to me in my genealogy hunt.

NewspaperARCHIVE.com is now adding content at a rate of more than 80,000 pages per day - that's roughly one page every second!

I couldn't possibly keep up with searching manually every single day and I'm loving this email notification benefit.


















































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November 5, 2009

Expert Connect Services

Ancestry.com has a very interesting custom research tool called Expert Connect.

Expert Connect services Expert Connect Services consist of five ways to get help with your family history research.

* Record Pickup: Save yourself a cross-country trip. Hire a researcher in another state to visit a specific archive, collect the record you need and mail it to you.

* Local Photo: Get a picture of your grandmother's headstone without leaving your living room. Pay a genealogist who lives near her old hometown to snap the photo for you.

* Ask an Expert: Pose a research question to a panel of experts, but only pay for the most useful answer. Then proceed with your research on your own.

* Record Lookup: Hire a professional to verify a hunch you have about an ancestor. Rely on an expert to identify the document you need and track it down for you.

* Custom Research: Outsource an entire section of your family tree, or recruit a seasoned genealogist for a project that's beyond your experience or time availability.

This is a great idea for those who live far from needed records, or are stuck on a difficult ancestor or who just need guidance in what to do next.