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February 28, 2010

Sharing Memories (Week 14): Grandmothers

We are on Week 14 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey Journal. I hope everyone will join me this week to share more memories! You know how happy we are to find an ancestor's diary or journal. Just imagine how excited your grandchildren or great grandchildren will be to read your stories in the future.

Even though we've been talking about school memories, and we may want to carry on with High School, I want to take a little side trip down memory lane, and talk about grandparents. What memories do you have of them? What did they look like? Were they happy go-lucky or serious? Talkative or quiet? What hobbies did they have, what did they work at in their younger years, where did they grow up - the list of memories you might have of your grandparents could be endless!

My Grandmother McGinnis, my father's mother, didn't talk much to us children, but she loved to play cards. Gin Rummy was her favourite. She'd play quietly, not saying much then suddenly cry out GIN! followed by a big smile and giggle. She had beautiful long white hair that was always in a bun at the back of her head, and I don't remember her wearing anything other than dark polka-dot dresses!

My other grandmother, my mother's mother, Grandma Ruth, was quite different. She always dressed beautifully in bright colours. Red was her favourite! Her hair was always styled and she chose her accessories carefully. These are photos of both my grandmothers with their first born grandchildren.

Grandma McGinnis never spoke of her family. I had no idea she had brothers and sisters, and knew nothing of her parents. Grandma Ruth however was fun and lively and told me stories of her childhood, of her brothers and sisters, of her parents and grandparents back in England.

Grandma McGinnis was widowed at age 57 and never remarried. Grandma Ruth married three times, outliving each of her husbands. I loved Grandma Ruth's stories of her past, and she is the grandmother who gave me many of her treasures when I was a teenager. Many of my family heirlooms are ones she passed on to me and I treasure them greatly.

What memories do you have of your grandmothers? I was a bit shy with my Grandmother McGinnis but only because she was so reserved. I hope my own grandchildren will have fun and loving memories of me when they are older.

February 27, 2010

CSI Genealogy: Free Canadian Census Chart for Family Groups

There was a good response from the Genealogy community about my CSI Genealogy: Census Charts post a few days ago.

Due to the interest shown, I have created a blank Canadian Census CSI Chart to use for a family group in all Canadian Census records. Please feel free to download and print a free copy of this chart. I hope it helps you organize your genealogy census data by family!

You can either SAVE the image to your computer hard drive then print it from any graphic program (be sure to use the LANDSCAPE orientation) or print it directly from the page when it loads.

February 26, 2010

Genealogy Treasures: A Watercolour Spurs Us to Find Out More

 
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My husband's grandmother gave him this watercolour painted in 1916 by J. Ades Fowler. We did a little research and found that the artist's full name was Joseph Ades Fowler and he died 5 March 1921 in Huron County Ontario.

According to his death certificate, Joseph Ades was born in Brighton England on 19 August 1850. His profession is given as architect, which surprised me. I thought he would be listed as an artist but perhaps painting was a hobby and not a profession for him.

His death certificate also revealed that Joseph Ades had a son Henry Ades Fowler who was living in Maywood (?) Illinois at the time of his father's death. Joseph Ades was living in Goderich Ontario at the time of his death.

We're very interested in learning more about Joseph Ades Fowler! When did he come to Canada from England? Why did his son move to Illinois - and what happened to him? Did he have other children and if so, did they stay in Ontario or move to the USA?

How did Joseph Ades' painting end up in an antique store or auction? Was he a prolific painter? His work seems quite good, but did he only paint a few or did he paint dozens?

Did he design any of the buildings in Goderich?

If you are an antique hunter as my husband and I are, you know how compelling the stories of the person who owned the object are. Genealogy and antique hunting go hand in hand. We like to find out about the people behind the objects - the provenance as it is called by antique enthusiasts. Sometimes we've been lucky enough to meet up with a descendant, and sometimes the antique ends up being returned to the family.

So Joseph Ades Fowler - who are you and what buildings did you design and see built in your lifetime? Where are your children or grandchildren?

If anyone has any answers or any more clues, please leave a comment here on this blog. Perhaps with help we can find a living descendant.

 UPDATE Aug. 21, 2013: I received this email today:  

Several years ago you posted an inquiry (that I just saw) about a painting by Joseph Ades Fowler. I’m not very good at reading blogs and how to reply on them so not sure if you received any replies. Joseph Ades married by maternal great grandfather’s sister Mary Heathcote Green. Joseph came to Toronto, Canada, it seems by himself, around 1870. 

Two years later, in the spring of 1872 Mary came to Toronto from London England with her father Josiah James Green (a druggist/chemist), mother and 3 siblings. Joseph Ades and Mary were married in the fall of 1872. I don’t know if they knew each other in England but in researching the Toronto directories discovered they lived on the same street in Toronto so perhaps that is how they met! 

 I haven’t come across anyone else online researching my extended family but I do have some information on their family in my old research files (which I have yet to document) so if your questions about Joseph Ades haven’t already been answered let me know and I will dig in my files and send you some answers about his career and family. 

Thanks, Gayle Farnes

February 25, 2010

CSI Genealogy: Census Forms Help Organize FIndings

How many times have you taken a careful look at your genealogy research only to realize that you never did get around to hunting for Great Grandpa Joe in the 1850 or 1851 census? Have you ever taken a good hard look at the chronology of the family you are searching? How often have you looked over your genealogy research? You might be very surprised at the clues and facts you've missed along the way!

But how can we organize our research so that it's easy to see what we have, what we still need to find, and what we've missed?

This is where CSI Genealogy comes into play!

C=Charts S=Success I=Investigation

With CSI Genealogy you create CHARTS to have a SUCCESSFUL INVESTIGATION into your family tree.

I've already shown readers of this blog a CHART I created for assessment and tax records. I've also got a chart for all those census record years you find. This chart is for Canadian census records so they cover the years 1842, 1851, 1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911.

Using Excel I created empty columns for each census year. On the left I have empty cells for name of husband, wife and children. I also left spaces for "others" meaning anyone else who shows up on a census year.

So I find my McGINNIS family in 1861 and carefully list their names and ages. I do this for every census year. This helps me see at a glance who I am missing, what census year(s) I still need to find and when an ancestor goes missing or dies.

You may notice the tiny notations in 1881 column on this chart. These indicate "married" (md) and are just my way of knowing I need to look under a married surname for women. I also note it for males just to have a quick reminder that a son is married and may not be living with his parents that year

Because some census years ask for citizenship or immigration status, I have a spot for that too.

Lastly, I like to keep track of exactly where the family lived each census year. I only list the parents' location on this chart, but I have another chart for locations and land records that I'll show you another time.

Because there is room, I have noted death years on the right (but I'm creating a new chart which will have a column for death year and another for death location). I've also made notes which remind me of important facts. On this chart for my McGINNIS family, I've noted that their daughter Fanny was baptised in Guelph in 1847. That indicates to me that they should show up in the 1851 census but as you can see, I have not found them.

I'm not likely to find them as the first page of the census I need is missing - and I suspect they were on that page! But I still want to be reminded that they were in the area as early as 1847, because I may want to hunt for other records that will provide more information regarding their settlement year.

Every time I pull this chart for my McGINNIS ancestors out, I am reminded that I've never been able to find Joseph, his wife Fanny and their four youngest children in the 1881 Canadian Census. Yes, I've looked in 1880 American Census too with no luck.

I may never find them - they may have been on the move and missed both census years, or the Fanny and son Joseph I found in Guelph *might* be the right ones (and Joseph Sr might be dead by then, but then where is young Robert?) or ..... At this point I have no explanation but this chart very nicely reminds me to KEEP LOOKING! And if I never find them on a census for those years, perhaps I will find them in another genealogy record.

February 23, 2010

Letters as Loot - Fascinating Project of Leiden University!

Thanks to the subscribers of the New-Netherland mailing list discussing the New Netherland Institute online, I found Letters as Loot, an absolutely wonderful project by the University of Leiden.

Quoting from the Leiden University website:

The National Archives in Kew, UK hold a treasure that causes real excitement among scholars: the recently rediscovered collection of Dutch documents from the second half of the 17th to the early 19th centuries, comprising over 38,000, both commercial and private, letters. These so-called sailing letters were confiscated during the wars fought between The Netherlands and England.

The research programme Letters as loot: Towards a non-standard view on the history of Dutch aims at exploring this extraordinary and highly valuable source for a new history of Dutch.

The project comprises three sub-projects. Two cross-sections are made in the source material at a chronological distance of about hundred years: the first of the period 1665-1674 (2nd and 3rd Anglo-Dutch Wars) and the second of the period 1776-1784 (4th Anglo-Dutch War and American War of Independence).

Every month, a new letter is translated and posted online. In the Monthly Letter posted in May/June 2009 was a fascinating letter written in 1664 by my ancestor Hendrick Meesen Vrooman to his brother Jacob. Hendrick had recently arrived in New Netherland (present day New York) and wrote to tell his brother Jacob in Leiden all about the new land he had settled in.

What an insight into both my ancestor and the time period when the English took New Netherland and it became New York.

Hendrick says in his letter "Furthermore I let you know that there have arrived three English ships at the Manhattans with soldiers and they have claimed the land and they say that it belongs to their king. And Stuyvesant [the governor of the New-Netherlands] has given it to them without one shot, with an agreement."

I spent an enjoyable hour browsing the other letters held at University of Leiden website. Just choose English from the main page if you do not read Dutch.

February 22, 2010

FamilySearch New Projects Coming Soon

Friends at FamilySearch tell me that recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process.

These projects will be searchable online at pilot.familysearch.org in the near future.

· Canada—1871 Mortality Census
· Mexico, Hidalgo—1930 Federal Censo
· U.S., Alaska—1920 Federal Census
· U.S., Indiana, Marshall County—Marriages, 1811–1959
· U.S., Illinois—1910 Federal Census
· U.S., Rhode Island—1905 State Census [Part 3]

February 21, 2010

Sharing Memories (Week 13): More School Memories (Gr. 7 & 8)

We are on Week 13 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey Journal. I hope everyone will join me this week to talk about more memories! Imagine how excited your grandchildren or great grandchildren would be to read your stories in the future.

Not everyone will have had the same school experiences that I did. I went to a different school between Grades 6 and 9, so that is what I want to talk about this week - memories of Intermediate Grades 7 & 8.

St. Andrews when it was first switched from a munitions factory to a school

In our little town of Ajax where I grew up, St Andrews was a school that only held 2 grades - 7 & 8. It was meant to combine the Grade 6 class from the "old" area of the town and the Grade 6 class from the "new" area. As the saying goes, I grew up on the wrong side of the tracks. Literally. The railroad tracks and a super highway (then called McDonald-Cartier Freeway, now known as Highway 401) divided our town.

The "new" area consisted of suburb type homes. The "old" area was wartime housing built for the women who worked in the munitions factory there in World War 2. There was definitely a class structure in place! New area kids did not usually mix with old area ones. We were the poor side of town, presumably not fit to enter the homes or play with those kids from the new side.

St. Andrews by the time I went to school there in Grades 7 & 8

So Grade 7 was somewhat traumatic! We old area kids knew we were going into a school where we were outnumbered by the snobby new area kids. It was a suprise to me that I actually mingled fairly well and made some good friends over the course of the next two years. So heading off to High School for Grade 9 was not as bad as I'd expected.

In Grades 7/8 I learned I was a decent enough singer to be chosen for Triple Trios. Anyone else remember those? And participating in the Provincial Wide Music Festivals? We did really well in one year, winning the Provincial title! But the only reason I did okay was that my best friend since Grade 3 was a very strong and good singer, and I always got to stand beside her! Without her, I'd have been wavering all over the alto part, unsure of how to stay in tune.

I managed to hang onto Janie's coattails all through our school lives, singing in choirs while her voice kept me on tune, playing French Horn (again sitting beside her) and having her French horn guide me to playing at the right time! Lots of fun and really good memories which I hope my children, grandchildren and other descendants will enjoy.

February 20, 2010

Help Find American WW2 Soldier

Can anyone help Jill find this American WW2 soldier? Jill found his Dog Tags in Australia and has asked my help in finding out about Stanley



Details can be found at American WW2 soldier

February 19, 2010

Live Roots Adds Access to FamilySearch Record Search Results

According to LiveRoots.com you can now view results from the Record Search pilot from within the Live Roots website.

Quoting from Live Roots website:

The FamilySearch Record Search pilot include millions of indexed records, and is expanding each month. When you perform a search in Live Roots, you will see a link to the FamilySearch Record Search feature in the "Available Partner Services" section.

You also have the ability to search a specific collection within the Record Search pilot from the corresponding resource page. Resources from the pilot are cataloged in Live Roots as soon as they are posted online.

I decided to give this new feature a try so went to the FamilySearch page on Live Roots. I was impressed with the speed of the search and the display of results but wanted to ask Illya D'Addezio, owner and creator of Live Roots, a few questions.

I wondered what the purpose was of adding this feature to the Live Roots website. According to Illya

The objective of Live Roots is to be a genealogical search "experience," not just a simple search engine. When you use a traditional search engine, the experience ends with a listing of results. With Live Roots, that's only the beginning. From the results, Live Roots shows you relationships between resources, and allows you to locate and/or preview related results from
other data repositories (e.g. Ancestry, Footnote, etc.).

What this amounts to is research efficiency, especially when your research involves a lot of repetitive searching, for example, a brick wall ancestor. Using Live Roots you can perform the same search across a dozen different repositories within a few minutes without ever having to reenter your search criteria or leave the Live Roots environment.


When I first used the new feature for FamilySearch, I mistakenly thought I was searching an index but Illya explained that it is not an index/image hosting
initiative, but a real-time, server to server access. This is the same as all of the other partner searches on Live Roots. A search on LiveRoots using the FamilySearch feature results in the LiveRoots server contacting FamilySearch server, obtaining the results and presenting them in LiveRoots in the format determined by Illya.

My concern that new records on Family Search would have a delay before being searching in Live Roots was put to rest when Illya explained this, because his method means that as soon as new records are available on the FamilySearch website, they are immediately available in the Live Roots experience.

My last question to Illya was "Why use the Live Roots FamilySearch feature rather than go directly to the Family Search website" He resonded that

"One of the main advantages to using Live Roots is the consistency it offers between the numerous data and book repositories, along with some of the
research management tools that simplify keeping track of when/where you found a useful resource. Bringing Family Search into the experience just adds to the efficiency, as now when you locate a record in Family Search, you can quickly see if
there are any related records in sites such as Ancestry or Footnote (and vice-versa)"

It's a great utility, and you really should try it out. Start your journey at the FamilySearch page on Live Roots.

February 16, 2010

Sharing Memories (Week 12): Valentine's Day Stories

We are on Week 12 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey Journal. I hope everyone will join me this week to talk about more memories! Imagine how excited your grandchildren or great grandchildren would be to read your stories in the future.

I got so busy with Valentine's Day and Family Day weekend here in Ontario Canada, that I never got to our usual Sunday blog with the next week's topic! I wanted to write about Valentine's Day Memories. Hopefully we all have some romantic or funny ones to share.

My father and mother never made a big deal out of Valentine's Day. I don't remember it as anything special, so my first memory is of waiting for a romantic gift when I was a very young bride! I think I've lost my memories of that first marriage, because I don't recall anything special for any of the 9 Valentine's Days we spent together. Looks like my Valentine Memories for my journal will be slim.

One year I hired a singing Valentine for my second husband who taught High School. For some reason I thought it would be fun to interupt his classes with a young woman dressed in stockings and tuxedo (think the Turtles girl...) who would serenade him in front of a room of teenagers! I don't think he appreciated it.

I hope you have some wonderful memories to share with us!

February 15, 2010

List of Winners in OliveTreeGenealogy Birthday Celebration

As promised, the random draw for 5 lucky winners of the 5
amazing prizes offered by Footnote.comicon , Ancestry.com and GenealogyBank.com has been made.

The 3 winners of a Footnote.comicon Annual subscription are:

Lisarps@gmail.com

mcgivney@yahoo.com

Katfrmwi@aol.com


The winner of Ancestry.com Annual World Deluxe
Subscription is

kathie.fortner@yahoo.com

The winner of the GenealogyBank.com 30 day membership is

bpayne@xtra.co.nz

Congratulations to the 5 winners and thank you everyone for participating in this celebration. A huge thank you goes to Ancestry.com, Footnote.com and GenealogyBank.com for being so generous and supportive during OliveTreeGenealogy's
birthday.

If you are one of the winners, please contact me at olivetreegenealogy@gmail.com to claim your prize.

I'm already planning for OliveTreeGenealogy's 15th birthday party next year and MORE wonderful prizes!

The list of winners is also being posted on the OliveTreeGenealogy.com Birthday celebration page

And now - time for Birthday Cake!

Lorine

February 13, 2010

Don't Forget Olive Tree Genealogy's Birthday Draw on Feb 15

It's not too late! You have until Midnight EST Sunday Feb. 14th to enter the draw for one of FIVE great prizes for Olive Tree Genealogy's 14th Birthday Celebration!

You can read more about this Happy 14th Birthday OliveTreeGenealogy celebration and enter for a chance to win one of the 5 prizes

The draw for 5 lucky winners will take place on Feb. 15th. Names will be chosen from subscribers to the Olive Tree Genealogy newsletter, so for a chance to win, be sure you are a subscriber. You can subscribe to this free newsletter
(which comes out 3 or 4 times a month) to enter your name

Thanks to the generous support of Footnote.comicon , Ancestry.com and GenealogyBank.com
there will now be FIVE lucky winners in the Olive Tree Genealogy Birthday Draw!
Footnote.comicon has generously donated THREE Annual Subscriptions to their detabases for the Birthday Celebration! Footnote.com helps you find and share historic documents. Their website brings you many never-before-seen historic documents through their unique partnerships with
The National Archives, the Library of Congress and other institutions.

Ancestry.com , the world's leading resource for online family history, have generously offered to provide an Annual World Deluxe subscription as one of the prizes for the Olive Tree Genealogy Birthday Celebration! The World Deluxe Subscription includes historical records and images from the
United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and more locations around the globe.

GenealogyBank.com is very kindly donating a free 30-day membership for unlimited access to their databases.
Genealogy Bank has the largest Newspaper Archive for Family History Research. Over 4,000 newspapers provide first-hand accounts about your ancestors that can't be found in other sources

February 10, 2010

Smile For The Camera: Be My Valentine

The word prompt for the 20th Edition of Smile For The Camera is "Valentine." Love is in the air, so celebrate with Smile by sharing a photograph of a Valentine; be that person or paper. The interpretation of Valentine is yours. Admission is free with every photograph!

This is a Valentine postcard from 1910 that I purchased many years ago. It was in a box of miscellaneous paper ephemera

It's an odd postcard in my mind, as the sender expresses no words of love or romance, yet has chosen a Valentine card image for Maggie (the recipient). Perhaps it was the only card he had on hand, or found in the shop, but it's always struck me as an amusing card for James to send to Maggie.

I've not done any research on Maggie or James so have no idea who they are! I'm sure Maggie at least could be found in the 1910 census records.


1910

Miss Margaret Rasch
146 North Division St
Buffalo N[ew] Y[ork]

Maggie

We have all got bad colds and the roads are very bad so geo [George?] hired Roy Smith to take you the machine [today?] You will get the machine before you do this card. [can't read this word] from James

February 8, 2010

2010 is the Year of the British Home Child

On Mon Dec 7 Parliament approved 2010 The Year of the British Home Child.

During the Child Emigration Scheme (British Home Children), between 1869 and 1939 (some up to 1948), over 100,000 children ages 1 - 18 were sent to Canada from Great Britain to work as farm labourers and domestics by over 50 Agents - Barnardo, Middlemore, Macpherson, Fegans, to name a few..

Events that have already taken place:
* New Brunswick Provincial Gov't passed 2009 Year of the British Home Child

* Nova Scotia the month of October 2009 was declared

* October 2010 issue of a stamp for the Home Child

* Australia Apologized to 10,000 Home Children immigrated there up to 1967

* Britain to apologize next year

Descendants make up 12%, over 4 million of the Canadian population.

2010 should be a year filled with special events, special displays in libraries and museums across Canada to honour them. If you are a descendant I hope you will get involved in planning some events.

The Welland Museum currently has a display for the Home Children until December 31st.

Maria Rye Home Children Database
Gail Collins 1869-1879 gcollen@sympatico.ca
Chris Sanham 1880-1896 chris@sanham.com

You can search theBritish Home Children ships passenger lists from 1865 to 1935 on Library & Archives Canada website.

If you find a name of interest, and if the child was a part of the Dr. Barnardo's homes, you can contact Barnardo's for the records. They can be reached at aftercare@barnardos.org.uk

My husband has a British Home Child in his ancestry and sending to Barnardo's for his records provided a wealth of informative genealogical detail plus photographs of the child when he was admitted to Barnardo's Homes in 1897.

Marj Kholi's Young Immigrants to Canada website is another must for those seeking a British Home Child ancestor. Descendants can also check the British Home Children Registry for a name of interest.

Another website of interest will be the British Home Children Descendants site.

February 7, 2010

Sharing Memories (Week 11) - More School Memories

We are on Week 11 of our 52 weeks of Sharing Memories - A Genealogy Journey Journal. I hope everyone will join me this week to talk about more memories! Imagine how excited your grandchildren or great grandchildren would be to read your stories in the future.

Last week we wrote about Kindergarten, our first day and year of school. I didn't have a lot of memories of my first year, but writing about my first day brought back a ton of memories about the next few years! So this week I thought it would be a good idea to carry on and write about Grades 1 to 6. I've chosen to end at Grade 6 for this week simply because I went to Lord Elgin School until Grade 6 and then to a different school for Grades 7 & 8. So for me it's a natural break in my memories. Please do feel free to choose your own guidelines and start/stop dates!

I didn't like school. There, I've said it! I hated having to sit and follow along silently while each student stood up and took their turn struggling to read "Dick & Jane". Are you old enough to remember those readers? I hated them! "See Spot run. Run, Spot, run! Jane is chasing Spot" Arrghh!!!

When I got to Grade 1 I was pretty excited because we were given our readers. I took mine home and finished it that night. Next day I turned it in to my teacher, saying I was ready for my next book. She laughed and said that reader had to last me all year, we did not get another one. Believe it or not, I cried.

I did not like recess. I'd worn glasses since I was 2 years old, and one of my eyes was always being patched (my good one, to force my bad one to work better). So my depth perception was not good and I was clumsy, always falling down. Recess was a nightmare for me, trying to join in games with the other children, but not doing well. I was one of those kids that was always the last chosen for any team activity. Remember Red Rover? Guess who was last chosen for the team? Guess who was first called on by the other team to come over? "Red Rover Red Rover let Lorine come over" was not a cry my team wanted to hear. I was the sucker the other team could nab easily.

Eventually my unhappiness in Grade 1 and 2 led me to act out, playing such pranks as locking all the washroom doors from the inside and crawling out underneath, then boldly (and foolishly) denying I'd done it when confronted by the school principal! I moved on to more outrageous behaviour and played hooky. Hopefully my grandchildren will not read this until they are out of school! I started going to a friend's house (her parents were not home during the day) and spending the day there reading comic books and eating chocolate. What fun! Of course I got caught but surprisingly my parents were very good about the whole incident, and got to the bottom of my rebellion.

Talks with the school principal resulted in me being allowed to read and do math at my own pace, and not be part of the group. I was given a set of reading booklets, told to go ahead and start reading them (in order), answer the questions at the end of each story and if I got the right answers, I could go on to the next one! I loved that, and sat quite happily and quietly in my little corner of the classroom, doing my work.

By the end of Grade 2 I was quite happy about school and looked forward to everything... except recess!

So, sharpen your pencils, get a new pen and join me in this journey down memory lane - Grades 1 to 6.

February 5, 2010

A Piece of History? Is this a Photo of Annie Moore arriving at Ellis Island?

About a month ago, Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak, Genealogist & Family History Expert, wrote about the recent discovery of photos of Annie Moore, the Irish teenager who was the first to arrive at Ellis Island when it opened on January 1, 1892.

The New York Times published a photo of Annie A second photo of Annie with her daughter has also been found.

But now for the mystery which Megan needs our help to solve! There is a third photo which may be of Annie and her two brothers the very day they arrived at Ellis Island! Please read Megan's article, view the photo, and give this some thought.

Here is Megan's plea:
If you have expertise in facial recognition, architecture, the history of Ellis Island or the Barge Office that preceded it, or in any area that might contribute to the resolution of this mystery, please post comments here or email me, whether they support the claim or refute it.

February 4, 2010

New Vietnam War Records Free during February on Footnote.com

FOOTNOTE.COM AND THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES RELEASE NEW VIETNAM WAR PHOTOS AND RECORDS ONLINE

-Over 27,000 Photos And Records Are Added To The Largest Online Vietnam War Collection-

This Press Release just arrived from Footnote.comicon . I will be exploring the collection myself later this morning!

Lindon, UT – February 4, 2010 – Today Footnote.com announced a major addition to its Vietnam War Collection: Army Photos and Unit Service Awards. Now totaling over 100,000 photos and documents, this collection helps visitors gain a better perspective and appreciation for this often misunderstood event in U.S. History.

“Our partnership with the National Archives has proven to be invaluable as we work to make these records more accessible,” explains Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “Previously you were required to travel to Washington, D.C. to see these records. Now anyone can access the original records through the internet.”

Army Unit Service Awards include documents relating to Presidential Unit Citations, Valorous Unit Awards and Meritorious Unit Commendations. These were usually awarded to units going above and beyond the call of duty, and in most cases, showing exceptional valor. These documents contain:

Dates of service
Duties performed
Letters of recommendation

The Army Photos feature various activities of the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. In nearly every case there is a caption or description of what was happening and the names of the soldiers featured in the photos. Everything ranging from daily duties to Bob Hope’s Christmas program is captured, providing a glimpse into what life was like for the soldiers.

“My dad is a Vietnam War hero, but I rarely can get him to share his experiences from the war,” says Justin Schroepfer, Marketing Director at Footnote.com. “Going through these photos allowed me to visualize a little more what he went through and the sacrifices he made for his country.”

In addition to these new records, the Footnote Vietnam War Collection also includes:

The Interactive Vietnam Veterans Memorial – featuring service records for each name on the wall
Photos of the Marine Corps in Vietnam - color
Photos of the Marine Corps in Vietnam - black and white

Footnote.com will continue to work with the National Archives to add more Vietnam War content online.

“These documents and photos tell a part of the Vietnam War story that you just can’t find in textbooks,” explains Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “It’s imperative that we preserve and share this side of history for future generations. We are encouraging everyone to come to Footnote.com and enhance these stories by adding their own comments, photos and documents.”

The Vietnam War Collection will be made free to the public during the month of February. To view these documents, visit www.footnote.com/vietnam.

February 3, 2010

Win 1 of 5 prizes from Footnote, Ancestry & GenealogyBank for OliveTreeGenealogy's 14th Birthday!

This is an update to my earlier announcement about OliveTreeGenealogy's upcoming 14th year of bring online.

I'm so excited to announce that thanks to the generous support of Footnote.comicon , Ancestry.com and GenealogyBank.com
there will now be FIVE lucky winners in the Olive Tree Genealogy Birthday Draw!

Footnote.comicon has generously donated THREE Annual Subscriptions to their detabases for the Birthday Celebration! Footnote.com helps you find and share historic documents. Their website brings you many never-before-seen historic documents through their unique partnerships with
The National Archives, the Library of Congress and other institutions.

Ancestry.com , the world's leading resource for online family history, have generously offered to provide an Annual World Deluxe subscription as one of the prizes for the Olive Tree Genealogy Birthday Celebration! The World Deluxe Subscription includes historical records and images from the
United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and more locations around the globe.

GenealogyBank.com is very kindly donating a free 30-day membership for unlimited access to their databases.
Genealogy Bank has the largest Newspaper Archive for Family History Research. Over 4,000 newspapers provide first-hand accounts about your ancestors that can't be found in other sources

You can read more about this Happy 14th Birthday OliveTreeGenealogy celebration and enter for a chance to win one of the 5 prizes

The draw for 5 lucky winners will take place on Feb. 15th. Names will be chosen from subscribers to the Olive Tree Genealogy newsletter, so for a chance to win, be sure you are a subscriber. You can subscribe to this free newsletter
(which comes out 3 or 4 times a month) to enter your name

February 2, 2010

The website for “Who Do You Think You Are?” launched today

The website for “Who Do You Think You Are?” launched today and can be accessed here: http://www.nbc.com/who-do-you-think-you-are/. The website features bios of the celebrities featured in the show, photos, and several video clips as well as articles on how to get started in family history.

The family history-focused series will lead seven celebrities on a journey back in time as they discover more about the ancestors who came before them. Lisa Kudrow, who executive produced the show, will be featured in the episodes, along with Sarah Jessica Parker, Spike Lee, Matthew Broderick, Susan Sarandon, Emmitt Smith, and Brooke Shields. Ancestry.com is a partner with NBC on the show. Tune into NBC Fridays 8/7c beginning March 5.

Hawass To Announce King Tut DNA Results : Discovery News

Hawass To Announce King Tut DNA Results : Discovery News

Posted using ShareThis

This is a fascinating example of the use of DNA in Genealogy research. If you haven't had your DNA done yet you may want to try it.

DNA Genealogy
Fast track your genealogy with a DNA test. Contact others sharing your ancestry, learn where your ancestors originated.


I had my brother submit his DNA for testing so that we could search our male McGinnis ancestry. It was very helpful and quite fascinating!

February 1, 2010

12 Months of Finding Ancestors: Life Insurance Records (Part 2 of a 12 Part Series)

Welcome to Part 2 of a 12 month series about finding and using less obvious genealogy records to find ancestors. Last month we talked about Medical Records and how they are often overlooked in our ancestor searching.

This month let's explore Life Insurance records. These can be difficult to find, and you will have to be very creative in your hunt for survining records. But you can start with a check of local archives as well as websites for various insurance companies. At the Insurance Company websites be sure to look to see if they have a historical archives.

Family Tree Connection holds many Insurance Company records You can search for a name of interest but must purchase a subscription to view details.

Some records are in books. We were lucky enough to inherit a book called "Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of Canada for the Year Ending 31st December 1890"

The book was published in 1891 in Ottawa, Canada, and included in its pages are approximately 60 pages of names of shareholders and guarantors for various Insurance and Assurance Companies across Canada.

The date for the list of names is 1890 and the wonderful thing about these is that they include people from all over Canada, as well as USA and Europe.

Each individual has a residence listed, in some cases, an actual street address. What really intrigued me about these lists was that the residences included such places as:

Ontario, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Scotland, New York, Quebec, Vermont, Pennsylvania, NWT, England, Illinois, India, Newfoundland, Manitoba, Cape Breton, Jamaica, Ireland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Massachussets, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Channel Islands, and Wales.

These lists can be used simply to verify that an individual lived in a certain place in 1890. They also contain quite a bit of detail for some entries, which are terrific clues for further research. We transcribed the names in this book and have placed them online for genealogists to search

You can see a list of the Company Records that we have transcribed and published online. Just click on any link to view the list of names. This is an ongoing project for OliveTreeGenealogy.com and you will have to check back to see when it is updated with more names.

The complete list of Company Records follows:

* The Accident Insurance Company of North America (List of Shareholders)
* The Boiler Inspection & Insurance Company of Canada (List of Shareholders)
* British America Assurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* Canada Accident Insurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* The Canada Life Assurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* The Citizens' Insurance Company of Canada (List of Shareholders)
* Confederation Life Association (List of Shareholders)
* The Dominion Life Assurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* Dominion Safety Fund Life Association (List of Stockholders)
* Dominion Plate Glass Insurance Company (List of Stockholders)
* Eastern Assurance Company of Canada (List of Shareholders)
* Federal Life Assurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* Guarantee Company of North America (List of Shareholders)
* London Life Insurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* Manufacturers' Accident Insurance Company (List of Stockholders)
* Manufacturers LIfe Insurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* North American Life Assurance Company (List of Guarantors)
* Quebec Fire Assurance Company (List of Stockholders)
* Royal Canadian Insurance Company (List of Stockholders)
* Sun Life Insurance Company (List of Shareholders)
* The Temperance and General Life Assurance Company (list of Guarantors)
* Western Assurance Company (List of Shareholders)

I urge researchers to hunt for Life Insurance records for an elusive ancestor! It is another set of records that is not often thought of but the details you can find about an ancestor can be quite thrilling!