Showing posts with label FindMyPast.com. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FindMyPast.com. Show all posts

June 18, 2014

Press Release: FindMyPast Buys Origins.Net

Press Release: FindMyPast Buys Origins.Net
The following announcement was received by Olive Tree Genealogy yesterday:

London, UK, June 17, 2014.  Findmypast.co.uk, the leading British family history company, announced today that it has bought Origins.net, one of the early pioneers of online records.

The first company to set up a pay-as you-go model for online family history records, Origins.net specialises in unusual and often hard to find British and Irish records.  Its many early records include rare marriage indexes, apprentices and poor law records.  Another key strength is its National Wills Index, which, combined with collections currently on Findmypast and those in development, will provide the largest online resource for UK wills and probate material.

Origins will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Findmypast.  Ian Galbraith, founder of Origins, will continue to work with Findmypast on collection development.  The extensive record sets from Origins will be brought into Findmypast over the next few months and the Origins website will continue to run as usual.

Elaine Collins, Partnership Director of Findmypast said: “We are delighted to bring Origins and its founder, Ian Galbraith, into the Findmypast group of family history brands.  By joining together, we are able to offer customers the most comprehensive collection of British and Irish online records.   This rich collection will help descendants of early North American settlers to bridge the gap to the old country, as well as anyone with UK ancestry looking to delve beyond 19th and 20th century records.”

Ian Galbraith, founder of Origins, said: “The partnership with Findmypast makes perfect sense for both companies and their customers. We have had a long association and together we can offer a broader family history experience and help people to fill in the blanks on the family tree and enrich their family story.”
 

February 4, 2014

FamilySearch Works to Put the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

FamilySearch Works to Put the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

FamilySearch Works to Put the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation
See Related Infographic
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—FamilySearch International (online at FamilySearch.org) is leading the way in digitizing and providing access to billions of historical genealogical records by collaborating with commercial family history companies and the online community. This collaboration will carve centuries off the time needed to increase access to the world’s historical records, enabling millions more people to quickly discover, share, and preserve family memories for generations.

Recent announcements of agreements with commercial family history companies are some of the first installments in fulfilling FamilySearch’s desire to remove the traditional barriers to genealogical research. FamilySearch CEO, Dennis Brimhall, explains that joining forces with other organizations, where possible, brings significantly more financial investment and technological resources to the family history industry than the nonprofit community could provide on its own.

FamilySearch plans to collaborate on digitization projects with commercial family history companies to publish new historical records collections on FamilySearch.org that have never seen the light of the Internet. Working with individual industry leaders such as Ancestry.com , Archives.com, findmypast, Fold3, and MyHeritage will also increase and broaden access to the records FamilySearch has already published online. FamilySearch plans to involve many other interested organizations that will provide records, tools, and other resources to allow more people to build, preserve, and share their family trees online.

In a keynote address at the RootsTech 2013 conference, Brimhall shared FamilySearch’s vision to empower people globally to share their family memories and save them for future generations. “Imagine if your ancestors had easy access to computers, digital cameras, and family history websites that allowed them to upload, preserve, and share important family memories through photos, stories, and vital names, dates, and places? How amazing would that be?” Brimhall said.

FamilySearch and its predecessors have been preserving and providing access to the world’s family history records for over 100 years. FamilySearch volunteers have indexed just over three billion records in extraction and online indexing projects, but they have only scratched the surface.
“For the top countries with the highest online research demand, using our existing resources and volunteers, it will take up to 300 years to index the 5.3 billion records that we already have,” Brimhall noted. “That means you and me and the next 10 generations of our posterity would not live to personally benefit from them. And there are another 60 billion records that still need to be digitally preserved. We can do significantly better by working together with other organizations and as a community.”

As new historical record collections are published under the latest agreements with FamilySearch’s affiliates, they will be available on FamilySearch.org and for free on Ancestry.com, findmypast.com, or MyHeritage.com to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch offers free public access to Ancestry.com and findmypast.com through 4,715 local FamilySearch-owned family history centers worldwide. Additional details regarding expanded records access will be announced sometime in 2014, when they are available.

Infographic: Putting the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

October 18, 2013

DC Thomson Family History and FamilySearch.org to make billions of records available for people to search

DC Thomson Family History and FamilySearch.org to make billions of records available for people to search
LONDON, England and SALT LAKE CITY, Utah--Annelies van den Belt, the new CEO of DC Thomson Family History, the British-based leader in online family history and owner of findmypast and Genes Reunited, has announced a major new partnership with US-based FamilySearch.org that will give family history enthusiasts access to billions of records online and new technology to collaboratively research their family roots. 



DC Thomson Family History, formerly known as brightsolid online publishing, is collaborating with FamilySearch, which has the largest collections of genealogical and historical records in the world, to deliver a wide range of projects including digital preservation, records search, technological development and the means to allow family historians to share their discoveries. 



More than 13 million records from FamilySearch.org launched today on findmypast.com, including major collections of births, marriages and deaths covering America, Australia, and Ireland. Around 600 additional collections, containing millions of records, will follow. 

The two organisations have a long history of working together on historical projects, including indexing 132 million records of the 1940 US census and two hundred years of British Army Service Records (Chelsea Pensioners) in a joint digitisation project with The National Archives. 



Van den Belt said: “This is fantastic news for our customers all over the world. As a leader in online family history we will be able to offer access to a much wider variety of records dating back hundreds of years and the first batch are ready to search on findmypast. The convenience of searching many treasures from FamilySearch.org along with our own extensive collections will provide rich new insights for our customers. 

“This partnership with FamilySearch will accelerate the momentum of our next phase of global growth into new non-English-speaking markets and give more people more access to more records to uncover their family history. This really cements our position as a market leader.” 



“We are excited to work with DC Thompson Family History on a vision we both share,” said Dennis Brimhall, CEO of FamilySearch. “Expanding online access to historical records through this type of collaboration can help millions more people discover and share their family’s history.” 



DC Thomson Family History is the British-based leader in online family history, which operates major online sites including findmypast, Genes Reunited and the British Newspaper Archive. It launched in America last year with its findmypast brand.



DC Thomson Family History has a strong record of partnerships with non-profit and public sector organisations such as the British Library and The National Archives among many other major archives and organisations around the world.

Credits: "Handshaking Business People" by adamr on FreeDigitalPhotos.net

October 2, 2013

Bright Solid Changes its Name

Bright Solid Changes its Name
Bright Solid, the UK based company that brings genealogists GenesReunited and FindMyPast websites, has changed their name. As of now it will be known as D C Thomson Family History.

D C Thomson may be known in the corporate world but I am willing to bet that the majority of genealogists don't have a clue who he is and why on earth Bright Solid would choose that for the name of their company. For those who are curious, D C Thomson is the media company owner.
Dundee-based media company owner

Bright Solid didn't ask for my opinion but if they had I'd have advised them to take a look at Ancestry.com's attempts at re-branding over the years. Does anyone remember the Generations Network?

It's usually a bad idea for a company to change it's name. All it does is confuse their customers. To be honest I always thought the name Bright Solid was odd but  I finally got the name straight. Now I have to learn their new one.

For more details see the Bright Solid post The Future of Family History is Digital

Credits: "Man And Question Mark" by Master isolated images on FreeDigitalPhotos.net



September 26, 2013

Submit Your Photos to Ask the Photo Detective

Submit Your Photos to Ask the Photo Detective
Readers may be interested in participating in knowing that Photo Detective Jayne Shrimpton analyzes two user-submitted photos every month. 

If you’d like to send your photo to Jayne, please register - See more at: http://blog.findmypast.co.uk/category/ask-the-photo-expert/#sthash.0TtVzZct.dpuf
To submit a photo you must register with FindMyPast but there is no charge for registration or the photo analysis.

For more details see Ask the Photo Expert

April 12, 2013

Need Help? Join D. Joshua Taylor on Twitter for a LIVE Q and A

Need Help? Join D. Joshua Taylor on Twitter for a  LIVE Q&A
Mark your calendars! 

Genealogy expert D. Joshua Taylor from findmypast.com will be holding a live Twitter question and answer session on April 15, at 1 pm EST.

Interested genealogists can follow along with the #fmpExpert hashtag or ask a question using @findmypastUS


February 3, 2013

Sneak Preview RootsTech Keynote Speakers March 21st

As a Rootstech official blogger, Olive Tree Genealogy was given permission to post this sneak preview of the Thursday morning (March 21, 2013) Keynote Speakers for Rootstech2013. Looks like a great line-up to me! 

DENNIS C. BRIMHALL
Dennis Brimhall is currently the President and CEO of FamilySearch International.  FamilySearch International is a worldwide organization helping individuals find, preserve, catalogue, and search genealogical information. FamilySearch International is sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  He was formerly the President and Chief Executive Officer of University of Colorado Hospital from 1988 to 2005. A native of Provo, Utah, Mr. Brimhall earned an undergraduate degree in zoology from Brigham Young University in 1972 and a master’s degree in management from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 1974.  Mr. Brimhall and his wife Linda have four children and live in Dammeron Valley, Utah.

SYD LIEBERMAN
Syd is a nationally acclaimed storyteller, an author, and an award-winning teacher. Many of his best-loved stories deal with growing up in Chicago and raising a family in Evanston, Illinois. Syd is also known for his original historical pieces. He has received commissions to write stories for some of America’s leading institutions and agencies, including the Smithsonian; Historic Philadelphia, Inc.; NASA; and the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center.  His work has garnered awards from the American Library Association, Parents' Choice, and Storytelling World. Syd was one of six tellers featured on the television special The Call of Story. He has also performed numerous times at the Timpanogos and National storytelling festivals. 

D. JOSHUA TAYLOR
D. Joshua Taylor, MA, MLS is the Business Development Manager – North America for brightsolid online publishing, the creator of findmypast.com. A nationally known and recognized professional genealogist, lecturer, genealogical author, and researcher, Taylor is the current president of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and the former Director of Education at the New England Historic Genealogical Society. Taylor holds an MLS (Archival Management) and an MA (History) from Simmons College, and is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Federation of Genealogical Societies Award of Merit, and the Rubincam Youth Award from the National Genealogical Society. Taylor was also a featured genealogist on NBC's Who Do You Think You Are?.

August 31, 2012

Findmypast.com Announces Partnership with Federation of Genealogical Societies

The following announcement was sent to Olive Tree Genealogy

Findmypast.com Announces Partnership with Federation of Genealogical Societies
Partnership makes records available to findmypast.com and
creates a vital source of revenue for local societies

LOS ANGELES, August 30, 2012Findmypast.com, an international leader in online family history research, today announced a national partnership with Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) to preserve, digitize and provide access to local records from genealogical societies across the country.

The collaborative initiative will help preserve genealogical records and provide a vital revenue stream for the societies. Throughout the remainder of 2012, findmypast.com will release records from the following pilot partners:
·         New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, the most authoritative source for research on New York families
·         Illinois State Genealogical Society
·         Williamson County (Texas) Genealogical Society

“As we aggressively grow our business in the U.S., we are looking to form partnerships that benefit both the genealogical community and findmypast.com,” said Chris van der Kuyl, CEO of brightsolid, the parent company for findmypast. “This partnership will benefit our customers by giving them access to records that can’t be found anywhere else and participating societies will receive royalties for record images viewed.”

The records are a fantastic addition to a growing collection of US records on findmypast.com. FGS members who participate will reach new audiences as each society and their collection will be promoted by findmypast.com

The society collection complements the new US and international records that will be made available on findmypast.com and could include:
·         Newspapers and obituaries
·         Bible records
·         Cemetery records
·         Birth, marriage and death records
·         Land records
·         Court records

“Through its partnership with findmypast.com, the Federation of Genealogical Societies is pleased to offer a way for its member societies to engage with content providers and publishers,” said Pat Oxley, President of FGS. “Currently, one of the biggest challenges for societies is the pressure to provide online content, while also growing their membership and operating budgets. Through this partnership, societies will generate income and entice new audiences.”

July 26, 2012

FindMyPast.com Offers Bargain on Global Records



FINDMYPAST.COM LAUNCH OFFERS BIG BARGAIN ON GLOBAL RECORDS TO FIRST SUBSCRIBERS

“Pioneer Offer” Provides World Subscription at a 75 Percent Discount;
$4.95 per Month Instead of $20.83 per Month

LOS ANGELES, July 24, 2012 - Findmypast.com, a British-owned family history website, is marking its launch into the U.S. genealogy market on July 24 by offering its first customers a world subscription at a 75 percent discount – just $4.95 per month.

This introductory price point will give access to not just a wealth of US census and vital records but also a vast overseas collection. The latter includes almost 1,000 unique British, Irish and Australian record collections, some of which contain up to 30 million records in a single collection. Findmypast.com is offering a limited number of these introductory-rate subscriptions on a “first come, first served” basis.

“The genealogy community knows $4.95 per month for these records is a steal,” says Brian Speckart, marketing manager of North America for findmypast.com and brightsolid online publishing, its parent company. “We want those new to family history searching to understand the weight of this offer before it’s over.

A 12-month World Subscription to findmypast.com will normally cost $20.83 per month or $249.95 year – but customers who are quick enough to secure the “Pioneer Offer” will get one for just $4.95 per month or $59.95 per year.

Findmypast.com is the new US addition to a global network of findmypast websites – it joins existing findmypast sites in the UK, Ireland and Australia. It has recruited a separate US team, based in a new office in Venice, California. It is also a participant in the 1940 US Census Community Project, which is currently indexing the 1940 US Census, for viewing on findmypast.com.

For more information on other subscription and payment options, visit findmypast.com.

July 24, 2012

Press Release: FindMyPast.com Launches into USA July 24!

BRITISH "DAVID" TAKES ON BILLION-DOLLAR U.S. "GOLIATH"
FOR SHARE OF U.S.'s GROWING ONLINE GENEALOGY MARKET

• Findmypast.com launches into U.S. July 24;
seeks to become go-to site for Americans of British and Irish ancestries

• World’s second largest genealogy company takes on its biggest rival,
with the help of 1,000 unique record collections and 75% annual growth


San Francisco, CA, July 24, 2012: Findmypast.com, a British-owned family history website, is launching into the growing U.S. genealogy market on July 24.

Findmypast is the flagship brand of brightsolid online publishing, a UK and world leader in online genealogy, with 18 million registered users across its family of sites, over a billion genealogical records dating back to 1200 – and a growth rate last year of 75%.

Yet, findmypast.com enters the U.S. market in the role of David facing Goliath in the shape of ancestry.com, the overwhelming market leader and the world’s largest genealogy company, with a market capitalization of a billion dollars.

“We’re not used to thinking of ourselves as small”, says Chris van der Kuyl, CEO of brightsolid, the world’s second largest genealogy company. “Our ambitions are big and the launch of findmypast.com is a major market entry. The truth is that it’s a growing market, with plenty of room for both of us.”

Global demand for genealogy products and services is, indeed, showing “promising growth”, found a market report published by Global Industry Analysts in January 2012. The market’s growth, it said, is being driven by the demand of over 84 million genealogists, each spending between U.S. $1,000 and US $18,000 a year on the pursuit. “The trend is expected to continue…”

A local contributor to this trend has been the release this year of the records from the 1940 U.S. Census, says Mark Mahaney, analyst and MD of Internet Research at Citigroup Investment Research. But the global, underlying reason is simply the Web. “Genealogy has been very much a niche market in the past because doing the research has been such hard work”, says Mahaney. “But the Internet has made it so much easier. You no longer have to travel to search out records. That’s been the big change.”
The launch of findmypast.com will offer U.S. customers access to not just a wealth of U.S. genealogical records but also a vast overseas collection. The latter includes almost 1,000 [980] unique British, Irish and Australian record collections, with some single collections containing up to 30 million records.

“This sort of added choice and competition has got to benefit U.S. consumers”, says van der Kuyl.

Findmypast.com is the new U.S. addition to a global network of findmypast websites – it joins existing findmypast sites in the UK, Ireland and Australia. It has recruited a separate U.S. team, based in a new office in Venice, California.
It is also a participant in the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project, which is currently indexing the 1940 U.S. Census, for viewing on findmypast.com.

The launch of findmypast.com follows growing global demand for the records and functionality offered by findmypast’s other sites, says van der Kuyl: “Last year, we had 4.5 million visits to findmypast.co.uk from other countries, led by the U.S., while 55% of findmypast Ireland visits came from outside Ireland.”

Findmypast.com will enter the U.S. market, armed with the unique wealth of its British and Irish genealogical records, as well as its unrivalled ease of search technology and its more flexible payment options.

“We aim to become the go-to family history site, first for Americans of British and Irish descent, and eventually for all Americans”, says van der Kuyl.

Over 40 million Americans or 13% of the total US population report British ancestry, according to the American Community Survey of 2009, although other estimates put the figure as high as 72 million or nearly a quarter of all Americans. Meanwhile, some 40 million Americans report Irish ancestry.

Findmypast.com will offer customers the chance to buy a “World Subscription”, providing access to many unique record sets of particular value to those tracing British or Irish ancestors. These will include:

• The most complete England, Wales and Scotland census collection available anywhere
• The most comprehensive online index of birth, marriage and death records in England and Wales: over 300 million records
• 42 million local parish records, dating back to 1538, and steadily growing
• Passenger lists from ships leaving the UK 1890-1960
• British Army Records 1760-1915
• A fast-growing collection of local UK records dating back to 1700
• Irish vital records dating back to the 13th century, plus millions of unique Irish land, estate, prison and court records
• The British Library’s Newspaper Archives, the world’s greatest newspaper archive [available via findmypast.com by late 2012]

In addition to its unique records, brightsolid prides itself on the unrivalled ease and quality of its search technology and on offering more flexible payment options than its rivals. Findmypast.com will allow users to pay either by the subscription model offered by most US genealogy sites, or on a pay-as-you-go basis, which some users prefer.

The U.S. launch of findmypast.com follows the news reported by Bloomberg last month that ancestry.com is seeking buyers. At least one source has mooted brightsolid as a possible candidate.

“We’ll always look at the right opportunities to grow the business”, says van der Kuyl, “and are also currently negotiating various strategic partnership deals. We are not, however, planning to buy ancestry.com but focusing instead on the U.S.  launch of findmypast.com.”

June 9, 2012

1940 US Census: 18 States Searchable by Name on FamilySearch

1940 U.S. CENSUS COMMUNITY PROJECT MAKES HISTORIC RECORDS FOR 18 STATES SEARCHABLE BY NAME, CELEBRATES MILESTONE OF 75 MILLION NAMES INDEXED THROUGH NATIONAL VOLUNTEER EFFORT

More than Half of the 1940 U.S. Census Records Indexed in Just Two Months Thanks to Thousands of Volunteers Across the U.S.

07 June 2012


SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (June 7, 2012)The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project announced today that its searchable index of 1940 U.S. census records has reached – and surpassed – the halfway mark toward completion. Thanks to the efforts of more than 125,000 volunteers, more than 75 million names from the 1940 U.S. census have been indexed with 18 state records already available to the public on all Project partner websites, including the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Archives.com, FamilySearch.org and findmypast.com. The records will also be made available in more than 7,000 public libraries nationwide in the coming months by ProQuest. The national service project, the first and largest of its kind, aims to establish a comprehensive searchable database and make the 1940 U.S. census records available for free.
 
Following just two months of volunteer indexing, records for the following 18 U.S. states are currently available and searchable by name, location and family relation:
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Kansas
  • Louisiana
  • Mississippi
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • Oregon
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Wyoming
“We believe that all people deserve free access to the 1940 U.S. census records so they can learn more about their family history, ancestors and the past. With the help of the Community Project partners, and especially volunteer indexers across the nation, we’re halfway to our goal,” said Megan Smolenyak, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “We didn’t expect to make this much progress only two months after the 1940 census records were released, so we’re excited and thankful to all of the enthusiastic volunteers.”
 
Since April 2, Community Project volunteers have indexed more than 75 million records and this number continues to grow quickly as more than 7,000 volunteers sign up each week. The timely progression of making the census records freely searchable online is a direct result of the growing numbers of volunteers. Those interested in lending a hand can learn more and sign up to be an official 1940 U.S. census volunteer indexer at the 1940 census website (the1940census.com). The project will release free searchable records for individual states as they are completed. 
 
The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is a joint initiative between the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com, ProQuest and other leading genealogy organizations. Thanks to advancements in technology, online volunteers worldwide can lend a voice to countless untold stories of their ancestors living, working and persevering as the “Greatest Generation.”
 
“Volunteer indexers have the unique opportunity to step into the past and read through hand-written records captured by census enumerators as they walked from house to house,” said Joshua Taylor, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “Through indexing, volunteers are essentially reliving history and helping provide others with the access they need to gain greater insights into the life and times of their own ancestors more than 72 years ago.” 
 
To learn more about the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project, track real-time progress of volunteer indexing efforts or become a volunteer, visit the1940census.com.  

May 9, 2012

6 Indexed States for 1940 U.S. Census Now Available!

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH (May 9, 2012)The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project announced today the availability of a free, searchable index of 1940 U.S. census records for six U.S. states, including Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire. Records for these states are now searchable by name, location and family relations thanks to the efforts of more than 100,000 volunteers nationwide.

“For the past month, Community Project partners have worked to establish the first free, searchable database of 1940 U.S. census records made possible entirely through the hard work of volunteers,” said Josh Taylor, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “We’re proud to bring easily searchable 1940 U.S. census records for Delaware, Colorado, Kansas, Oregon, Virginia and New Hampshire online for people to learn about their ancestors and life and times in these states more than 72 years ago.”

Since April 2, Community Project volunteers have indexed more than 45 million records and this number continues to grow quickly as more than 10,000 volunteers sign up each week. Those interested in lending a hand can learn more and sign up to be an official 1940 U.S. census volunteer indexer at the 1940 census website (the1940census.com). The project will release searchable records for individual states on an ongoing basis with an aim to make the entire 1940 U.S. census searchable by the end of 2012.

The 1940 U.S. Census Community Project is a joint initiative between the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, findmypast.com, ProQuest and other leading genealogy organizations. Thanks to advancements in technology and to volunteers nationwide, Project partners and volunteers can lend a voice to countless untold stories of their ancestors living, working and persevering as the “Greatest Generation.”

“When you index U.S. census records, what you’re essentially doing is stepping back in time and walking in the shoes of the enumerator some 72 years prior,” said Megan Smolenyak, spokesperson for the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project. “The indexing experience is much like walking down a street, ringing doorbells and learning about a specific neighborhood in 1940. Only now, volunteers can explore these fascinating records from the comfort of our own homes.”

To learn more about the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project and to track real-time progress of volunteer indexing efforts, visit the1940census.com.

February 25, 2012

You Can Help With the 1940 US Census (37 days and counting)

the1940census.com Are you ready? 37 more days until the 1940 US census comes online!

I was invited to be a 1940 US Census Ambassador and have signed up. If you would like to participate, you can submit a request to be an Ambassador or you can volunteer to help index the census.

Volunteer to be part of the 1940 US Census Community Project

Volunteer to be part of the 1940 US Census Community Project to help index the 1940 US Census

You can also follow the Twitter account for the 1940 US Census Community Project at @the1940Census

Register to become a 1940 Blog Ambassador 

the1940census.comAs a 1940 Blog Ambassador, you will have access to exclusive content including badges for your site, blog post and contest ideas, blogger events, project updates and more. 1940 Blog Ambassadors will also have opportunities to be featured on the 1940 U.S. Census Community Project Official Blog.





Sponsors

The following websites and societies are sponsoring the 1940 US Census. Please pay them a visit.

Archives.com
FamilySearch
findmypast.com
Association of Professional Genealogists
Federation of Genealogical Societies
National Genealogical Society

December 17, 2011

Three Genealogy Powerhouses Join Forces to Publish 1940 US Census

News Release

For Immediate Release

16 December 2011

Three Genealogy Powerhouses Join Forces to Publish 1940 US Census
 

SALT LAKE CITY—Three leading genealogy organizations, Archives.comFamilySearch International, and findmypast.com, announced today they are joining forces to launch the 1940 US Census Community Project. The ambitious project aims to engage online volunteers to quickly publish a searchable, high quality name index to the 1940 US Census after it is released in April 2012 by the National Archives and Record Administration of the United States (NARA). The highly anticipated 1940 US Census is expected to be the most popular US record collection released to date. Its completion will allow anyone to search the record collection by name for free online. Learn more about this exciting initiative or how to volunteer at www.the1940census.com.

The 1940 US Census Community Project is also receiving additional support from leading societal organizations like the Federation of Genealogical Societies, National Genealogical Society, and Ohio Genealogical Society.

The population of the US in 1940 was approximately 130 million. NARA’s census images will not have a searchable index. The goal of the 1940 US Census Community Project is to create a high quality index online linked to the complete set of census images as soon as possible. The index will allow the public to easily search every person found in the census and view digital images of the original census pages. The collection will be available online for free to the general public at Archives.com, FamilySearch.org, and findmypast.com, the sponsors of the community project. This new collection will open access to family history research like never before for this period in the US.

“The 1940 Census is attractive to both new and experienced researchers because most people in the US can remember a relative that was living in 1940. It will do more to connect living memory with historical records and families than any other collection previously made available,” said David Rencher, Chief Genealogical Officer for FamilySearch.

The collaborative project will also pool the collective resources, know-how, and marketing reach of Archives.com, FamilySearch, and findmypast.com to engage and coordinate the volunteer workforce needed to deliver the ambitious project. Additionally, Archives.com and findmypast.com will make substantial financial contributions to make the 1940 US Census online name index possible and work with nonprofit FamilySearch to bring additional new records collections online—making even more highly valued family history resources available to the entire genealogical community.
 

August 7, 2009

Friends Reunited Sold

Media group DC Thomson, is jumping further on the genealogy bandwagon through its £25 million acquisition of the social networking site Friends Reunited.

Friends Reunited started as an online service for reuniting school friends, but in 2003 launched a sister service called Genes Reunited, which publisher DC Thomson will now run alongside its own family history site, findmypast.com.

This may have some interesting consequences for genealogy researchers so be sure to watch this merger carefully.

March 25, 2008

UK Censuses 1841-1901 Coming to WorldVitalRecords.com

Find My Past Partners With FamilyLink.com, Inc.
UK Censuses 1841-1901 To Be Online at WorldVitalRecords.com

PROVO, UT, March , 2008 ---Find My Past, a family history and genealogy website based in London, England, containing over 550 million family history records recently announced its partnership with FamilyLink.com, Inc. to bring UK Censuses 1841-1901 online at WorldVitalRecords.com (a service of FamilyLink.com, Inc.).

“I really admire what Paul is doing at WorldVitalRecords.com. We are excited to have our census records as part of the WorldVitalRecords.com’s subscription because it will make our census records more accessible to an American audience who probably wouldn’t think of using our company as the first place to look for these records,” said Elaine Collins, Commercial Director, Find My Past. “We are also excited for this partnership because WorldVitalRecords.com has a successful track record and will continue to succeed in the genealogical industry.”

The UK census records comprise WorldVitalRecords.com’s largest database in the World Collection. As part of this agreement, WorldVitalRecords has already added the 1861, 1881 and 1891 censuses to its collection. Search this new UK Census at World Collection of Records