Showing posts with label German Immigration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label German Immigration. Show all posts

July 24, 2012

Pennsylvania German Pioneers Signature Marks

Margaret asked Olive Tree Genealogy about the Palatine Ships Passenger Lists on my site:
On the Palatine ship lists, there are many passengers who have various letters between their names....I know what “X” means, but not the other letters.
I am particularly interested in “U” and “N”
Examples:

Jacob (E) Taubefishel
Peter (B) Barth
Frietz (M) Mengel
Theobald (N) Nabinger
Hans (H) Stayman
Nicholas (N Z) Timberman
Hans (O) Timberman
Joseph (J) Flure
Margaret -What you have spotted is the names of those who signed the Oath of Allegiance. Many could not write and so had their marks they made. As you noted, some used an X as their signature, but others were able to write an initial or two.

So you may see a first name initial, or a surname initial or both. In some cases a man might use a stylized mark but in any case these letters are simply the representation of their names.  If you are interested please see an earlier blog post on Dutch handmarks. It's quite a fascinating subject!

October 4, 2011

Emigration via Hamburg Presentation

Rebekka Geitner a historian at the Ballinstadt Emigration Museum in Hamburg, Germany will be in the Twin Cities area giving three presentations at three locations during the period of 22, 23, 24 October 2011. She will then travel to St. Louis, Missouri to be a presenter at the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International's - Genealogical / Cultural Conference to be held from 26-29 October 2011. This is an outstanding opportunity to meet and learn from this International Historian. Plan now to attend any or all of these important events. Date / Time: Wednesday - Saturday, 26 - 29 October 2011 Presentation Title: Friday 28 October 2011 Breakout 2 11:00 am - 12:15 pm Hamburg Emigration Museum Saturday 29 October 2011 Breakout 4 2:00 - 3:15 pm Eastern European Emigration Via Hamburg Location: Sheraton Westport Chalet Hotel, St. Louis, MO. Host: Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International (CGSI) More Information: Full details on the CGSI's 13th Genealogical/Cultural Conference, 26-29 October 2011 are posted on the website, www.cgsi.org

September 30, 2011

Emigration Presentation: The View From Hamburg

Rebekka Geitner a historian at the Ballinstadt Emigration Museum in Hamburg, Germany will be in the Twin Cities area giving three presentations at three locations during the period of 22, 23, 24 October 2011. She will then travel to St. Louis, Missouri to be a presenter at the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International's - Genealogical / Cultural Conference to be held from 26-29 October 2011. This is an outstanding opportunity to meet and learn from this International Historian. Plan now to attend any or all of these important events. Date / Time: Monday, 24 October 2011, 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Presentation Title: Emigration and Public History: The View from Hamburg Location: Room 308 / 311 Elmer L. Anderson Library Univ of Mn. 222 - 21st Ave South, Minneapolis, MN Parking: http://www1.umn.edu/twincities/maps/EALib/ Host: Immigration History Research Center - University of Minnesota More Information: https://events.umn.edu/015062 Cost: Free

September 22, 2011

Germanic Emigration via Hamburg Presentation

Rebekka Geitner a historian at the Ballinstadt Emigration Museum in Hamburg, Germany will be in the Twin Cities area giving three presentations at three locations during the period of 22, 23, 24 October 2011. She will then travel to St. Louis, Missouri to be a presenter at the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International's - Genealogical / Cultural Conference to be held from 26-29 October 2011.

This is an outstanding opportunity to meet and learn from this International Historian. Plan now to attend any or all of these important events.

Date / Time: Sunday, 23 October 2011 12:30 pm - 5 pm (includes a break and ends with a social hour).

Presentation Title: Germanic Emigration via Hamburg

Location: Buenger Education Center - Concordia University, 200 Syndicate St. North (near Hamline Ave and Concordia Ave), St Paul, MN (Free parking on the north-west and west sides of the building on weekends)

Host: Germanic Genealogy Society

More Information: http://www.ggsmn.org/Meetings.htm or call Tamara 612-729-6357.

Pre-registration deadline: 15 October 2011 Cost: $25 (those who pre-register will be entered to win some special door-prizes).

September 13, 2011

Hamburg, Germany Emigration Museum Historian to Speak in Twin Cities Area

Hamburg, Germany Emigration Museum Historian to Speak in Twin Cities Area (New Ulm, St. Paul, Minneapolis), and then St. Louis, Mo. Rebekka Geitner a historian at the Ballinstadt Emigration Museum in Hamburg, Germany will be in the Twin Cities area giving three presentations at three locations during the period of 22, 23, 24 October 2011. She will then travel to St. Louis, Missouri to be a presenter at the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International's - Genealogical / Cultural Conference to be held from 26-29 October 2011. This is an outstanding opportunity to meet and learn from this International Historian. Plan now to attend any or all of these important events. Date / Time: Saturday, 22 October 2011 5:00 pm - Social Hour, 6:00 pm - Dinner, 7:00 pm - Presentation Presentation Title: Via Hamburg to the world: Emigration from the Bohemian Forest to the USA Location: Turner Hall, 102 S. State Street, New Ulm, MN. Host: German-Bohemian Heritage Society More Information: please contact Jenny Eckstein jieckstein@comcast.net Other event dates to follow

November 14, 2008

Immigrants to Canada before 1865 now online

Library and Archives Canada has just added a new searchable database for immigration to Canada before 1865. This is an important set of records since ships passenger lists to Canada before that year did not have to be archived.

In 1803, the British Parliament enacted legislation to regulate vessels carrying emigrants to North America. The master of the vessel was required to prepare a list of passengers. Unfortunately, few such lists have survived. So we must look to other sources for the names of our ancestors arriving in Canada before 1865.

Some lists have been identified and indexed by name in the LAC database. It also includes other types of records such as declarations of aliens and names of some Irish orphans. Search Immigrants to Canada Before 1865 at LAC

Other lists of immigrants to Canada before 1865 can be found at Ships to Canada

May 17, 2008

Return of Emigrants Landed at the Port of Kingston, Ontario Canada 1861-1882

Today OliveTreeGenealogy.com updated the Return of Emigrants Landed at the Port of Kingston, Ontario Canada 1861-1882 with the addition of the following years:

June 1863 | June 1863-Aug. 1863 | Aug 1863-Sept. 1863 | Oct 1863-Jan. 1864 | Jan 1864

To date we have Oct. 1861-Jan. 1864 online for this Project. Many immigrants are shown as coming in from American ports such as New York. Many came in via Quebec. You won't want to miss this if you are hunting for ancestors arriving in Canada before 1865!

The General Remarks are interesting, although small and difficult to read. Most are quite lengthy, some simply state that a ticket was given for a loaf of bread.

For example Peter McLaren from Scotland to Quebec has the following notation "being destitute and deserving of joining friends at Thorold I gave him a pass to [Lacroix?]"

John Mill from Ireland had this note "His wife was confined on [unreadable] coming out and is now very poorly.. They are out of money...."

Mr. Leibke [?] of Germany is noted as "going to join his son in Sombra".

One of the saddest notations is for James Reich and family on 23 Jan. 1863 "the daughter Jane died near Prescott of diptheria, the family passed up to Guelph, the St. Andrews Society took charge of the body of girl and promised to see her decently interrred"

The column headings for each individual which are transcribed and online are Date of Landing; Name of Emigrant or Head of Family; From what Country; Via what Seaport Town; Destination; Condition, general appearance, health; No. of male adults; No. of Female adults; No. under 6 years; No. over 6 years and under 12

The column headings in the original ledgers which are not transcribed are in what Township Employed as Servants; In what Township settled, or bought land; Amount of passage tickets issued; Amount of provisions; Amount of Medical aid; amount of Capital brought by them; General Remarks.

March 19, 2008

NEW! One Step Search Engine to the three new NARA immigration databases

Steve Morse has just created a One Step Search Engine for the three new NARA databases for Germans, Italians and Russians to the USA.

Using Steve's form, the name of the ship, the port of departure, and the date. is presented when you do the initial name search. NARA just gives you is manifest ID and expects you to go to another form to enter that ID and get the name of the ship, the port of departure, and the date.

Another feature on Steve's form is the use of dropdown lists to select certain values (such as occupation) rather than NARA's method for getting the list of possible values for that field.

These new search tools are at the bottom of the OTHER PORTS section of Steve's home page.

September 8, 2007

Finding Ancestors Immigration in Almshouse Records

In the early 1800's port cities in the USA bore the burden of immigration. By the time they arrived, so many immigrants were tired, hungry and poor they ended up in the City Almshouse. This meant the citizens had to take care of them. At first the citizens of the city asked the Mayors for funds to support the poor. Eventually they asked the states, and by mid-century some states (Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts) set up State agencies to deal with the issue. Eventually, beginning in the 1880's, the Federal Government nationalized the programs.

Dating back to the colonial era, New York City assumed responsibility for its citizens who were destitute, sick, homeless, or otherwise unable to care for themselves. The city maintained an almshouse, various hospitals, and a workhouse on Blackwell's Island (now called Roosevelt Island) for the poor.

These Almshouse records often contain immigration details, such as name of ship, date of arrival in USA and port of arrival.

Olive Tree Genealogy has an ongoing project to transcribed and publish New York Almshouse Records. The first set is for the years 1819-1840 and includes Ship Captain's Name, Date of Bond, Sureties, Date Discharged, Death Date, Remarks, etc.

For example, under date 1820 March 11 Elizabeth Kennedy age 34 is listed as having died June 14, 1820; her daughter Mary Ann died Nov. 5, 1820

Researchers can use the clues in the Almshouse records (admission date, ship captain's name, owner's name, etc) as well as census records, to narrow the time frame of arrival. Families with children born in one country, such as England, and then in New York will find it much easier to narrow the time frame of immigration.

For individuals recorded in 1855-1858 Almshouse Records for New York City the information includes ship name, date of sailing, ports of departure and arrival

August 20, 2007

Palatine (German Palatinate) History

PALATINE HISTORY
by Lorine McGinnis Schulze
Olive Tree Genealogy http://olivetreegenealogy.com/
Copyright © 1996


Excerpt:

"The Palatinate or German PFALZ, was, in German history, the land of the Count Palatine, a title held by a leading secular prince of the Holy Roman Empire. Geographically, the Palatinate was divided between two small territorial clusters: the Rhenish, or Lower Palatinate, and the Upper Palatinate.

While the land of the Palatinate was good for its inhabitants, many of whom were farmers, vineyard operators etc., its location was unfortunately subject to invasion by the armies of Britain, France, and Germany. Mother Nature also played a role in what happened, for the winter of 1708 was particularly severe and many of the vineyards perished. So, as well as the devastating effects of war, the Palatines were subjected to the winter of 1708-09, the harshest in 100 years.

The scene was set for a mass migration. At the invitation of Queen Anne in the spring of 1709, about 7 000 harassed Palatines sailed down the Rhine to Rotterdam. From there, about 3000 were dispatched to America, either directly or via England, under the auspices of William Penn. The remaining 4 000 were sent via England to Ireland to strengthen the protestant interest....."


Read the complete article History of the Palatines or start your search for Palatine ancestors in

Palatine Ships' Lists to PA

Palatine Ships' Lists to NY

Palatine Child Apprentices 1710-1714

Family Names

Palatine Denizations (Naturalizations) 1708

[The full article has been published, with my permission as Irish Palatine Story on the Internet in Irish Palatine Association Journal, No. 7 December 1996]