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April 30, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 48 R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

Peter the Mascot

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

April 29, 2017

Rescue Photo Album 1930s Carillon Quebec page 7

Continuing with the Flynn family photo album that I rescued from a nearby antique store:

This page is labelled "Carillon 1930" The photo on the left has "Age 4/30"



April 28, 2017

The Tradgedy of Bon Secours Ireland Deaths

796 children died at Tuam, Co. Galway Ireland in the Bon Secours Mother and Baby Home between 1925 and 1960. No one realized so many, far more than the norm, had died until remains were uncovered recently. The Journal has published the names and ages of all the children who died.

Investigations revealed the remains when sewage chambers were dug up.

Read more about this disturbing event at Remains of young children and babies found in sewage chambers at Tuam mother and baby home

April 26, 2017

Finding an Ancestor Whose Surname Changed

We've all seen it - the puzzle family tree for an ancestor whose first name is different in different records. In one he is recorded as James, in another as Robert. But we have proof that James and Robert are the same man. How is this possible? Most often further research reveals that our James was baptized as Robert James at birth, and has been using his first and middle names interchangeably. Mystery solved!

Occasionally the name issue out to be a bit more complicated to figure out, such as when an ancestor has a widely used nickname. Such was the case with my husband's grandfather, born Thomas Leon, but called Charlie by his friends and family. Early in life he began using the name Charlie in official records. Researching various records will find him as Charlie, Charles, and Thomas.

Of course it's critically important to verify that you have the correct ancestor. Check spousal names, children's names, etc to be sure Person A is the same individual as Person B. Compare ages, and any other details you find.  It shouldn't be too difficult to prove that the man using the name Thomas in some records is, or is not, the man using the name Charlie in others. But what about an ancestor whose surname changed? That's a much more challenging genealogy puzzle.

In researching my Vollick ancestry over 30 years ago I was able to trace back from my great-grandmother to my 5th great-grandfather Isaac Vollick, a Loyalist who fought in Butler's Rangers. But I could not get back beyond Isaac. My one clue was that he came from Albany New York, but I found no Vollick individuals in New York before the American Revolution. I began tracing forward, researching each of Isaac's children (Matthias, Cornelis, Annetje, Storm, Sophia, Elizabeth, Catharina, Sarah, and John) trying to find the family's origins.

Eventually I discovered that the son John used the surname Van Valkenburg (and variants) as well as Vollick. Storm used Follick as well as Vollick so it became clear that the name Vollick most likely had not been in existence prior to the American Revolution or Isaac and family coming to Niagara as Loyalists. The pieces began falling into place. A clue here, a notation there, but the best was a 1772 baptismal record for his son John recording the surname as Van Falkenburg. The baptisms for his other children in Albany and Schoharie had Isaac recorded as Valk and Falk.

I searched land records, petitions, church records, census, Loyalist records and more, eventually proving that Isaac was the illegitimate son of Isaac Van Valkenburg and Maria Bradt, and that he eventually began using the surname Vollick. Each of those surnames had a dizzying array of variations - Van Valkenburg, Van Falkenburg, Valkenburg, Falkenburg, Van Voltingburg, Vollick, Follick, Valk, Falk, Valich, Vollack,  and more!

Interestingly enough, because I had done so much in-depth research on the entire family, I had massive numbers of documents for Isaac, his wife Mary and each of his children and even his grandchildren. Last year I decided to share my research with other descendants, so I published 3 volumes of books on the family.

I'm really pleased that my challenging genealogy puzzle which took me many years to solve, allowed me to share these fascinating stories of Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick and his sons Storm and Cornelis. 

 From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: V.1 The Loyalist Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick and his Vollick & Follick Children by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

8.5" x 11" (21.59 x 27.94 cm)
68 pages

Available on Amazon.com or Amazon.ca or CreateSpace

The story of Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick, a Loyalist who fought with Butler's Rangers during the American Revolution. He and his wife Anna Maria (Mary) Warner settled in Upper Canada in 1782. Isaac's Land Petitions, Affidavits of witnesses regarding his Loyalty to the British Crown, letters about Mary's ordeal after American Patriots burned her home and sent the family fleeing north to Canada in 1779, and other items are found in this book. Stories of Isaac's ancestors back to the first settlement of New Amsterdam (present day New York City) and Albany in the 1620s and Mary's ancestors back to the 1709 Palatine immigration from Germany to New York are included. 

From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: V. 2 Cornelius Vollick and his Follick and Vollick Descendants to 3 Generations by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

8.5" x 11" (21.59 x 27.94 cm)
110 pages

Available on Amazon.com or Amazon.ca or Createspace CreateSpace
Cornelius Vollick, son of Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick, left New York during the American Revolution. Eventually the family arrived in the wilderness of Upper Canada in 1782 as impoverished Loyalists. They settled in the Niagara area with other disbanded soldiers from Butler's Rangers. There Cornelius met and married Eve Larroway the daughter of another Loyalist who fought with Butler's Rangers. With their 9 children Cornelius and Eve carved a life in this new land. Descendants will find documents, photographs, newspaper clippings and information about Cornelius and Eve and their children and grandchildren in this 110 page Family history book.

From Van Valkenburg to Vollick: V. 3 Storm Follick and his Follick and Vollick Descendants to 3 Generations by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Available on CreateSpace and Amazon.com or or Amazon.ca

Storm Follick aka Vollick, son of Isaac Van Valkenburg aka Vollick, left New York during the American Revolution. Eventually the family arrived in the wilderness of Upper Canada in 1782 as impoverished Loyalists. They settled in the Niagara area with other disbanded soldiers from Butler's Rangers. There Storm met and married Ester. With their children Storm and Ester carved a life in this new land. Descendants will find documents, photographs, newspaper clippings and information about Storm, his wife Ester, and their children and grandchildren in this 108 page Family history book.
 















April 25, 2017

New Book on Norris Families in England

The Norris Family of Kent England
by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

This book follows two distinct Norris families in Kent England.

The first is the Norris family found in Lenham Kent in 1773 when Edward Norris and Catherine Earl were married in the Lenham parish church. Four generations of their descendants are followed.

The second is the Norris family of Elmsted and Waltham Kent. This family was in Elmsted in 1680 when John Norris was baptised in St. James the Great church. By the time of his marriage to Mary Carr in 1710, he had moved to Waltham. His descendants are followed for three generations.

Documents and family group charts are included.

8.5 x 11 ", 32 pages




April 24, 2017

Find an Ancestor to Canada in Poor Law Union Records

Are you looking for an ancestor coming to Canada between 1836 and 1853? You may already know that this is a challenging time period in which to find a ships passenger list, as Canada did not archive Canadian ships passenger lists until 1865.

Sample Poor Law Union Record
But there are substitutes, including Olive Tree Genealogy's names of those found in Poor Law Union Records of individuals being sent to Canada from England.

Other substitute immigration records for pre-1865 immigration to Canada include

There are many more substitute immigration records listed, with links, at Canadian Ships Passenger Lists Before 1865

April 23, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 49R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

Caption on and under this photo reads "Photo with inscription. 13_10_15. "Thanks for kindness attention from Corporal Barber ASCMT 1st Division Field amb."

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"