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October 28, 2020

New Netherland Settler Jan Sipken

 


Jan Sipkens was a Dutch soldier who settled in New Netherland sometime before October 1674. 

His marriage intentions were recorded in the New Amsterdam Reformed Dutch Church that month, and they revealed his origins were in Amsterdam Holland. 

A search of the Amsterdam church records found his baptism in 1656 to parents Sipke (aka Zipke) Auckus and Baefje Jans.

October 23, 2020

What is Your Oldest Ancestral Item?


It's always a thrill to inherit or find an object that once belonged to an ancestor. I had chills when I found store tokens made by my 9th great-grandfather Henry Noldred of Ramsgate Kent England. Henry was a grocer who had his own tokens created to spend in his store in place of official money.

I was so intrigued by this new-found information that I started researching to see if I could find any of his tokens and I found that one of his existed created circa 1650!. I also learned that Ramsgate was spelled Romansgate back then. 

Once I found that one of Henry's tokens had been sold on an auction site a few months before, I became determined to find another and purchase it. I'm excited to say I succeeded! I managed to find two in England, and I bought them both. I plan on having a small plaque made with Henry's birth, death and location. Then I'll have the tokens and the plaque framed and it will have a place of honour on my wall.

This is the description of the tokens: (rosette)HEN.NOLDRED.IN.ROMANS , around beaded inner circle, three tobacco rolls / logs of wood.


Rev: (rosette)GET.IN.YE.ISLE.OF.TENNET , around beaded inner circle, HIS HALF PENY in three lines. M. Dickinson 454. Neither obverse or reverse dies represented in Norweb.

What is the oldest ancestral item you own?

October 21, 2020

New Netherland Settler Harmen Janie Ryckman

1644 Marriage of Harman Janss Ryckman

 Harmen Janse Ryckman (my 9th great grandfather) came to the New World with at least one child - his daughter Margarita (Grietje) Harmense Ryckman. By 1662 Grietje had married Jacques Cornelise Van Slyke the son of Cornelis Antonissen Van Slyke and his Mohawk wife, Ots-Toch. Jacques and Grietje settled in the new village of Schenectady. Grietje's father lived in Albany as early as 1666 and there he died circa 1677

October 18, 2020

Lost and Found: HAIGHT family mementoes

 Joyce McFarlane in Ontario has the following items to give to any descendant who wants them.

Have been going through some old boxes of parents stuff. I have come across, a picture, a bible, and hymn book. picture labelled Jay Haight, bible belonged to Mrs Claire Haight, and Hymn book, Clement Haight. Looking for any relatives that might want these.
 

 

 

You can contact Joyce through her Facebook page

Looking for an ancestor photo? See LostFaces.com!

 

October 16, 2020

Walking Photographs

My Father & Mother 1946

Someone posted an intriguing photo on Twitter. It was simply a photo of two sisters walking down a sidewalk circa 1940s. It suddenly occured to me that during the time of Sidewalk Photographers roaming the streets of large cities, there must have been hundreds if not thousands of such candid photos taken. 

Of course the way it worked was the photographer would snap a picture then try to convince the subjects to purchase a copy. 

I have a few of those "Walking photos" and thought it would be fun to post them here. Maybe you have some too? Tell us about them in the comments below.

 Left is a photo of my mom and dad in 1946. I love this photo because mother is pregnant with me! 

I have another earlier Walking Photo of my grandmother and mother holding my brother's hands. Behind them is my aunt (mother's sister) with her son. It was taken ca 1939 either in Guelph or Toronto Ontario Canada

 




Next is a Walking photo of one of my Australian cousins - my grandmother's brother Albert Simpson with his grandson Johnny Salmon. It was taken in the early 1950s

 

 



 

 

 

 



October 14, 2020

New Netherland Settler Hendrick Meesen Vrooman


Image: 1648 record for Hendrick Meesen Vrooman

Hendrick Bartholomeus (Meesen) Vrooman and five children ages 15, 13, 11, 7 and 5 years old are on the passenger list of D'Eendracht (The Concord) arriving in New Amsterdam New York on 17 April 1664. 

The ages of these children fit the children known for Hendrick: Adam born ca 1649, Eve born ca 1651, Johannes baptised 1653 Leiden Netherlands, Kathlyntje baptised 1657 Leiden, and Bartholomeus baptised 1659 Leiden. Hendrick's wife and mother of the children was not with them and we might assume she was dead. 

October 11, 2020

Curious About Ancestor Effigies or Busts?


Hertfordshire churches contain numerous effigies and busts of people whose images were not recorded elsewhere. 

Inside All Saint’s church in Willian, Thomas and Lucy Wilson are remembered with these colourful carvings on their memorial

October 9, 2020

Don't Miss This New Saskatchewan Database!


 MemorySask: the Saskatchewan Archival Information Network is a database of descriptions of archival material held in Saskatchewan archives as well as Nunavit. It is a work in progress, with new descriptions being added regularly.

You can search names or locations. If you have Saskatchewan ancestors you will want to check this out.




October 7, 2020

New Netherland Settler Lodewyck Post

Sometime between October 1647 and July 1652, Lodewyck Cornelils Post, his wife Agnietje Bonen, and their children left Amsterdam Holland to settle in New Netherland (New York). Research into Naarden Holland church records has revealed the birth of Lodewyck, and the marriage of his parents in that city.


October 1, 2020

Olive Tree Genealogy on Episode of TV Series Historical Niagara!

Recently I was asked to appear as a guest on a TV series produced by Peter Andrew Sacco, called Historical Niagara. The series is seen on TV in Ontario Canada and the episode I was asked to appear in is on Laura Secord. Peter interviewed me via Zoom and it was a great experience.

The Laura Secord episode is available to watch on YouTube. If you use the scroll bar to find me, look for my bright pink top around the 28 minute mark. I hope you'll watch the entire episode as it's quite interesting, and walks you alongside Laura on her famous journey.



If you don't know who Laura Secord is (no, not the chocolate makers!) she is our Canadian heroine who warned the British during the War of 1812 that the Americans were planning a surprise attack. To warn the British forces, Laura had to walk through thick forest 20 miles inside American occupied territory. But watch the episode and you will learn much more about Laura. 





 

 



September 30, 2020

New Netherland Settler: Pier Family

 

It has always been known that THEUNIS JANSZ. PIER, an early settler in New Netherland (New York) was born circa 1600 in Holland. 

Chris Brooks and I researched and found Theunis' baptism. His parents' names are now known! We found a great deal on the family -- and our jointly authored article Origins of the Pier Family in the Netherlands and an Update of Their Connection to the Ostrander Family by Lorine McGinnis Schulze and Chris Brooks, was published in the July 2000 issue of the New York Genealogical & Biographical Record. in Deventer, Overijsel, Netherlands. 

He married Jannettie Arentsdr. on September 14, 1624 in Amsterdam Netherlands. Theunis Jansz's sons Jan and Arent, were the immigrant ancestors of the PIER family in America.

Read more at Pier/Peer Family


September 23, 2020

New Netherland Settlers: Salomon Abbelse GOEWAY & Barber Philippse

Baptism of Solomon 1617

The story of the Goeway family in New Netherland begins with Salomon Abelse who was baptised in Amsterdam Holland in 1617, and his wife Barber (Barbara) Phillipse who was baptised in 1619 in Amsterdam. Read more at Goeway Family

September 21, 2020

Immortalizing an Ancestor the Sarah Hare Way

 


In 1744 Sarah Hare died of septicaemia, after pricking herself on a needle. In her will she requested that a wax effigy be made of her and displayed in the Holy Trinity Church, Stow Bardolph. Her wish was granted. 

She was a daughter of Sir Thomas Hare, whose family had a reputation for local philanthropy. Her ancestors built almshouses, and Sarah left each resident a small bequest.

This is wax Sarah in her cabinet



September 18, 2020

Anyone Need to Cast a Spell? Magical Poppet Found in a Chimney



The strange little 19th century doll which is currently on display in the History Room of the Black and White House Museum was found in a crevice of the brickwork of 21 East Street, Hereford. In a fold of her dress was a handwritten note which read: 

"Mary Ann Ward, 
I act this spell upon you from my holl heart wishing you to never rest nor eat nor sleep the rester part of your life. I hope your flesh will waste away and I hope you will never spend another penny I ought to have. 
Wishing this from my whole heart."

The body is made of wood, with arms and legs of red checked cotton material. Her head bears traces of paint; she has a string and silk pigtail and wears a red spotted dark blue cotton dress. .





It seems reasonable to suggest that the doll is a magical object know as a Poppet (or mommet, moppet, poppit or pippy). These were used in folk magic and witchcraft for casting spells on a person or to aid that person through magic. It was from these European dolls that the myth of voodoo dolls arose

It is clear that this spell is hostile in intent and hopes to rectify an injustice, real or perceived. What is not clear is who this is aimed at, unfortunately there are a number of Mary Ann Wards born in Hereford and Herefordshire in the 19th Century, and at least one Mary Ann Ward who moved here (in this case from Birmingham). 

The word poppet is an older spelling of puppet, from Middle English popet, meaning a small child or a doll. In British English it continues to hold this meaning. Poppet is also a chiefly British term of endearment.

September 16, 2020

New Netherland Settler: Jan Cornelis Damen

1585 Marriage of Jan Damen's grandparents in Utrecht
 

Jan Cornelise Damen, my 9th great-grandfather, was the common ancestor of the DAMEN family. In 1650 he left Bunnik, a village on the Ryn in Utrecht, for Long Island New York, and married Fytie/Sophia Martens. The surname might be derived from Demen, a hamlet in North Brabant where Jan most likely lived at one time.

On 29 Apr. 1655 he purchased a house and land adjoining that of Jan Dirksen's in Brooklyn and by 1677 was keeping a tavern here. Read more at THE DAMEN FAMILY OF LONG ISLAND NEW YORK

September 9, 2020

The Huguenot Walloon Uzille Family

 My 8th great grandfather was the Huguenot Pierre Uziele. Huguenots were French Protestants who held to the Reformed, or Calvinist, tradition of Protestantism. His parents at his baptism 14 January 1659/60 at the French Church in Mannheim Germany were David Usille and Marie Casier, He is registered as Pierre. His godparents were Philippe Casier and Marie LeNoir

There is a marriage record from Bergen Church Marriages in NJ for:Josi: Pieter and Cornelia Damen, m. by the minister upon certificate from Breuckelen, Staten Island. 6 April 1686. "Josi" would be the phonetic representation of Pieter's surname "Uziele"


September 7, 2020

New Netherland Settlers: Boelen Family

 

Boele Roeloffsen, the immigrant ancestor of the Boelen family, arrived in New Netherland in 1659. 

His wife Bayken Arents, their three children, and Bayken sister Tryntie Arents sailed with him on board the ship Otter. 

Two more children were born to Boele and Bayken after they settled in New Amsterdam. Continue reading at 

Ancestry of the Boelen Family & their Connection to the Ten Eyck, Clock, Coert, Roos, and Hellaken Families 


September 4, 2020

The Barheit Family Revealed: A Genealogy of Hans Coenradt and Barenjte Jans Straetsman

The exact date of Hans Coenradt arrival in New Netherland is not known but it is most likely he was among the refugees fleeing Recife Brazil in April 1654. 

The first record found indicating he was in New Netherland is dated in Albany (Fort Orange) in early December 1655. Sometime between April 1654 and December 1655, Hans arrived in New New Netherland. As New Amsterdam came into view with its gallows and weather beaten wooden houses dominating a raw, windswept landscape, the Barheit family must have had mixed feelings. 

Continue reading at 

The Barheit Family Revealed: A Genealogy of Hans Coenradt and Barenjte Jans Straetsman, the Immigrant Ancestors of the Barheit Family of Albany New York


September 2, 2020

Finding Ancestors in Canadian Genealogy Records

 

Finding Ancestors in Canada 

To find ancestors in Canada you need to know which Province or Territory in Canada your ancestors settled. 

Provinces and Territories in Canada were settled at different times. Canadian genealogy records such as Vital Stats or Census were kept starting at different times. Not all Canadian genealogy records have survived. 

Where do I Start Looking for my Canadian Ancestors?

To find your Canadian ancestor, start your search in Ontario,  Quebec Acadia ,  Alberta British Columbia ,  Manitoba New Brunswick,  Newfoundland Nova Scotia  Northwest Territories Prince Edward island Saskatchewan , or Yukon Genealogy records. 

Search Canadian Immigration Records 

Did your ancestor arrive in Canada BEFORE 1865? Search for passenger names in Olive Tree Genealogy free ships passenger lists 1535 to 1864

Did your ancestor arrive in Canada AFTER 1865? Search for passenger names in Olive Tree Genealogy free ships passenger lists 1865 to present


August 30, 2020

Understanding Dutch Patronymics

The Dutch were much slower than the English in adopting surnames as we know them. Patronymics ended theoretically under English rule in 1687 with the advent of surnames, but not everyone followed the new guidelines. In the Netherlands, patron ymics ended mostly (especially Friesland) during the Napoleantic period around 1811 when everyone had to register and select a family name.

The most common Dutch naming custom was that of patronymics, or identification of an individual based on the father's name. For example, Jan Albertszen is named after his father, Albert. Albertszen means son of a man named Albert. The patronymic was formed by adding -se, -sen, or -szen. Daughters would very often have the ending -x or -dr. added. For example, Geesjie Barentsdr. (Barentsdochter) is named after her father Barent. 

An individual could also be known by his place of origin. For example, Cornelis Antoniszen, my 9th great- grandfather, was known in some records as 'van Breuckelen', meaning 'from Breuckelen' (Breuckelen being a town in the Netherlands). The place-origin name could be a nationality, as in the case of Albert Andriessen from Norway and my 9th great-grandpa, originator of the Bradt and Vanderzee families - he is entered in many records as Albert Andriessen de Noorman, meaning the Norseman.

Continue reading DUTCH PATRONYMICS OF THE 1600s

August 28, 2020

Update of Ontario Canada Births to 1914 Online

 Ancestry has updated their Ontario Vital Records. Genealogists can now search for Births 1832-1914 on Ancestry.com, Ancestry Canada, Ancestry Australia, or Ancestry.UK

This database is an index to over 2 million births that were registered in Ontario between 1832 and 1914. 


Information contained in this index includes:

  • Child's name

  • Birth date

  • Sex

  • Birth county

  • Father's name

  • Mother's name

  • Archives of Ontario microfilm series and roll information



August 26, 2020

Z is for Zwahlen Ancestry

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is Z for Zwahlen.

Magdalena Zwahlen was my 8th great-grandmother. I know nothing about her except that in 1702 she married Michael Jeremiah George Miller in Zweisimmen, Bern, Switzerland.

Since I know nothing about my 8th great grandparents, let me tell you about their daughter Barbara Ann Miller born circa 1707.

Barbara Ann Miller married Nicholas Bieri circa 1720 in the Palatinate. Barbara could write and after Nicholas' death in 1761 she served as adminstratrix of her husband's estate.

Minutes of the Board of Property Lands in Pennsylvania: At a special metting of ye Agents at ye Governors the 5th Oct'r. 1765:
On the motion of Mr. Weiss for [Barbara] Peery, widow of Nicho's Peery ye Gover'r orders y't ye Surv'r Gen'l shall in 3 Mo's make enquiry whether ye 500 a's Right sold by the H'rs of Rich'd Crosby to Philip Ebrecht was not located by s'd Crosby in his life time.


As administrix of Nicholas' estate, Barbara entered a caveat on 5 Dec. 1765 against a survey for Nicholas King which took off valuable land from the estate of Nicholas Beery. A new survey on 22 July 1766 showed the fence line agreed upon when nicholas sold the land to Nicholas King, and the dispute was resolved in favour of Nicholas Beery.

Pennsylvania Caveat Book NO. 3. Land Office, 5 Dec. 1765: Barbara Peery, the Widow of Nicholas Peery and adminstrix of his Estate in behalf of herself and children entreth a Caveat against a Survey lateley made by Charles Lukens, Deputy Surveyor for one N.....olas King by which Survey is taken of a Valuable piece of meadow and orchard late ye Estate of the said Nicholas Peery and contained in a Survey for him made the 11 day of Sept. 1761. Dated Phliad'a. Dec. 5, 1765.

Barbara married as her second husband between 28 July 1766 and 9 June 1767, Jacob Kagy, farmer of Heidelberg Township, York Co. PA. On 19 Oct 1765 Jacob had been warrantee of 50 acres adjoining his other land in Heidelberg Township in Conewago Valley. This land was surveyed at 51 acres and allowance.

On 9 June 1767 Barbara and Jacob and 8 of the 9 children of Barbara and her first husband, Nicholas Beery, released to Abraham Beery, the other son, all right or dower right, title and claim in the estate and property of Nicholas Beery in Manchester Tp. consisting of two tracts of land, 143 acres and 60.5 acres, and all the buildings and improvements theron.

Jacob and Barbara were still alive on 10 Nov. 1787 when Jacob made his will. He states he is living in Heidelberg Township, York Co. PA.  See Jacob Kagy's notes for his will.

August 24, 2020

Captain Adriaen Crijnen Post

 

My 9th great-grandfather, Adriaen Crijnen (possibly Quirijnen), Post was most likely from The Hague, Netherlands. He and his wife Clara or Claartje Moockers, resided in Brazil in the West India Company's colony.

From 1630 to 1654 (24 years!) , Recife, a Northeastern city in the Atlantic coast, Brazil, was holded by the WIC (West India Company);   In 1637, the WIC directors realized to put a General Governor at the head of the brazilian colony or The Dutch Brazil (also Nieuw Holland):  the Count Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen (House of Oranje)who stayed there for 7 years and besides the obvious interests on the prosperous sugar trade from Brazil to Europe, he leaded a staff formed by scientists; architects; astronomers; biologists; artists, cartographers; etc., all of them taking part on the raise of a new town named Maurits-Stadt in his honour.  This town was builded in an island (Island of Antonio Vaz), contiguous to the port of Recife, original site of the present metropolis.  Among these advisors of the Count: Pieter POST, Archite


Adriaen's daughter Maria (my 8th great-grandmother) was baptised in Recife Brazil in June 1649. By the time Brazil fell to the Portuguese in 1654, the family had left for the Netherlands. On 30 June 1650 the ship "New Netherland's Fortune" sailed, arriving in New Netherland on 19 December 1650.


Adriaen and his family were on Staten Island by 1655. Adriaen was a representative of Baron Hendrick van der Capellen, the owner of one-third of Staten Island. As the superintendent of a group of twenty people who were to farm Staten Island, Adriaen set up a colony which flourished.


Read more about Adriaen at https://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/nn/surnames/post.shtml

August 22, 2020

The Story of the Orphan Frederick Markham

My husband's great-grandmother Elsie Phyllis Markham was orphaned at the age of 8 months. Her older brothers, Albert ages 8 and Frederick 2 years old were also orphaned when their parents succumbed to illness in London England in October and November 1898.

The boys were sent to orphanages and Elsie was taken in by relatives, eventually brought to Canada by her brother Albert Finch who had been sent to Canada as a Barnardo Boy in 1901. Frederick was also eventually reunited with his brother and sister

Read Albert's story at O is for Orphans 

Frederick's Story

2 year old Frederick was sent to his aunt and uncle for a very short time, but a few months after arrival in their home, he was sent to Miller's Orphanage in Bristol. His uncle did not want to continue feeding Frederick and his 8 month old sister Elsie. 

We find Frederick at the age of 4 in the Orphanage, and he was still there at the age of 16. Finally when he was 18 his brother Albert, who had been sent to Ontario Canada as a  Barnardo Child, had saved enough money to send for Frederick to join him.

On 5 May 1914 Frederick arrived in Quebec and from there went on to join his brother in St. Mary's Ontario. His sister Elsie had arrived 8 months before, again due to Albert's paying for her passage.

World War 1 broke out soon after Frederick's arrival and in March 1916 he signed up in the CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force). He was 20 years old. He was killed fighting in France two years later.

In memory of Sergeant  FREDERICK ARTHUR  MARKHAM who died on April 7, 1918

Service Number:  823627

Force:  Army

Unit:  Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment)

Division:  14th Bn.

Burial Information:

Cemetery: DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY

Pas de Calais, France

Grave Reference: VI. F. 64.





August 20, 2020

Albert Andriessen de Noorman aka Bradt

2 Nov. 1636 Atlantic Ocen Baptism of Storm son of Albert Andreissen & Annetje 

Albert Andriessen, or Albert Andriessen Bradt was one of the earliest Norwegian settlers in New Netherland. He came from Fredrikstad, a town at the mouth of the Glommen, the largest river in Norway. In the early records he is often called Albert de Noorman (the Norwegian). 

After 1670 he became known as Albert Andriesz Bradt. Whether he was related to the Bratts of Norwegian nobility, can not be ascertained. The Bratt family lived in Bergen, Norway, before the early part of the fifteenth century, when it moved to the northern party, of Gudbrandsdalen. It had a coat of arms until about the middle of the sixteenth century. Since that time the Bratts belong to the Norwegian peasantry. They have a number of large farms in Gudbrandsdalen, Hedemarken, Toten, and Land.' In the state of New York there are many families of the name of Bradt, descendants of the pioneer from Fredrikstad. 

 The name of Albert Andriessen occurs for the first time in a document bearing the date August 26, 1636, an agreement between him and two others on the one hand, and the patroon of the colony of Rensselaerswyck, Kiliaen van Rensselaer, on the other. The agreement was made and signed in Amsterdam. It states that Andriessen was a tobacco planter. He may have learnt the cultivating of tobacco in Holland, where tobacco was raised as early as 1616. 

 " In the name of the Lord, Amen. On conditions hereafter specified, we, Pieter Cornelissen van munnickendam, millwright, 43 years of age, Claesz jans van naerden, 33 years of age, house carpenter, and albert andriessen van fredrickstadt, 29 years of age, tobacco planter, have agreed among ourselves, first, to sail in God's name to New Netherland in the small vessel which now lies ready and to betake ourselves to the colony of Rensselaerswyck for the purpose of settling there on the following conditions made with Mr. Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, as patroon of the said colony, etc. "Thus done and passed, in good faith, under pledge of our persons and property subject to all courts and justices for the fulfillment of what is aforewritten, at Amsterdam, this 26th of August [1636]. 'In witness whereof we have signed these with our own hands in the presence of the undersigned notary public . . "Kiliaen Van Rensselaer "Pieter Cornelissen "albert and riessen . . -. "Claes jansen. "J. Vande Ven, Notary." 

 As Andriessen was twenty-nine years of age when he made the agreement with Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, he must have been born about 1607. Pursuant to the stipulation in the agreement, he sailed, accompanied by his wife, Annetje Barents of "Rolmers," and as it would seem by two children, October 8, 1636, on the "Rensselaerswyck," which arrived at New Amsterdam March 4, 1637. 

 Continue reading at Bradt Family

August 18, 2020

The Story of the Orphan Elsie Markham

My husband's great-grandmother Elsie Phyllis Markham was orphaned at the age of 8 months. Her older brothers ages 8 and 2 years old were also orphaned when their parents succumbed to illness in London England in October and November 1898.

The boys were sent to orphanages but Elsie was taken in by relatives, eventually brought to Canada by her brother Albert Finch who had been sent to Canada as a Barnardo Boy in 1901.

Read Albert's story at O is for Orphans 

The story of 8 month old Elsie

According to Elsie's son Bert, Elsie was an orphan. Her parents Albert and Edith were said to have died in an epidemic in England ca 1900. Elsie was sent to an orphanage then out to work for a Jewish lady, then her brother sent for her to come to Canada. Elsie had 2 brothers - Albert Finch and Frederick Markham. 

Intrigued by the family lore I decided to research Elsie and find out what happened to her. 

In February 1899 Elsie was with her paternal aunt and uncle, Frederick and Maria Markham in London England. Her brother Frederick Markham was in Millers Orphanage in Bristol, and her brother Albert Finch was in Barnardos Homes.

Her aunt and uncle gave Elsie up sometime between 1899 and 1901.  Records reveal that her uncle was growing tired of the extra expense caring for her.

1901 found 3 year old Elsie living with the MacGregor family. It appears they took her in as a foster child.

Donald G Macgregor Head M 44 M House Painter Worker Scotland
Hannah Macgregor Wife M 41 F   Undefined Scotland
Elsie Markham Daughter S 3 F   Undefined Shepherds Bush

I do not know how long Elsie was with the MacGregor family but in 1913 at the age of 15 she was on her way to Canada, thanks to her older brother Albert. Albert, how I wrote about previously  
at O is for Orphans  had saved his merger earnings as a Barnardo Home Child sent to Ontario Canada and paid for Elsie's passage to join him in St. Mary's. 

Elsie sailed on the Royal George, arriving in Quebec in September 1913 and was soon on her way to her new home. Four years later Elsie married a hard-working farmer Bristol Holden. She was already pregnant with a son (my husband's grandfather) by Bristol's hired man George Cooper, but whether or not Bristol knew the child was not his, is not known. She and Bristol had a happy marriage, and Elsie bore 5 more children. 

She lived until the age of 94, dying in St. Mary's in 1993. Her husband Bristol had died almost 30 years previously and she never remarried. 

All three children who were orphaned at such young ages, reconnected in Canada. Little Frederick's story will be next, and I  must warn readers it is not a happy ending story. 





August 15, 2020

Y is For Yorkshire Ancestors

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is Y for Yorkshire

My youngest son has Yorkshire ancestors through his father's Schulze lineage. I don't have any that I know of (yet).

Georg Heinrich (Henry) Christian Schulze was born (out of wedlock) in the City of Hannover on 18 December 1840 and baptized at Market Church on 4 April 1841. His mother was listed as Sophie Wilhelmine Reinecke, of Hannover, and as the father of the child the mother indicated Heinrich Christian Schulze, of Goslar, who was a foreman in a cutting-factory at that time. Among the godparents of the child were Georg Christian and Georg Heinrich Reinecke (who were brothers of the child's mother.


Henry Schulze emigrated to Yorkshire England circa 1868. We do not know if he was married when he arrived, or married later in England, but no marriage has been found in England. His wife's name was Marie (Mary) Catharina Friederke Gercken and she had been issued travel documents in 1867 as a single woman. Her immigration record has not been found.

For more details on the Schulze family in England, and the Schulze lineage in Germany, please see my book The Schulze Family of Germany & Yorkshire England


The Schulze Family of Germany & Yorkshire England
 
 Georg Heinrich Christian (Henry) Schulze, a skilled cabinet maker, left Germany for Yorkshire England between 1867 and 1868. He and his wife Marie Catharina Friederke (Mary) Gercken settled in Bradford where their ten children were born.


August 13, 2020

W is for Walloon

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is W for Walloon

Walloons come from Belgium and have many historical and cultural similarities with Huguenots from France.

I have written a book about one Walloon immigrant who settled in New Amsterdam (now New York City), New Netherland.

New Netherland Settlers: A Walloon in New Amsterdam:: Adriaen Vincent and his Wife Magdaleen Eloy - 2nd edition! available on Amazon

Adriaen Vincent, a Walloon from Belgium, made the perilous journey to New Netherland with his wife Magdaleen and their young family in the early 1640s. 


A former West Indies Company soldier, Adriaen was embarking on a new life. The family settled in the village of New Amsterdam, which would one day become the city of New York. Life could not have been easy for the couple, faced with a different culture and language. But settlers were pouring in and New Amsterdam was flourishing. 

Within a few years Adriaen and Magdaleen opened a tavern which catered to sailors and new arrivals. Their fortunes soon took a turn for the better and the family settled into their new life. This book contains new information on the family in the Netherlands and New Netherland, as well as details on descendants of Adriaen and Magdaleen

August 11, 2020

V is for Van Names

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is V for Van Names. I have several, all from Holland. They all ended up in New Netherland (present day New York) in the 17th century. You can read about some of them on my New Netherland Settlers section.

Vanderburg
Van Alstyne
Van Horn
Van Rottmer
Van Slyke
Van Schaik
Van Woert
Van Valkenburg

August 9, 2020

T is for Tightrope Walker

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is T for Tightrope Walker and yes, I have one in my family tree.

So today I want to tell you about my very adventurous 2nd cousin 3x removed, Stephen Peer the Tightrope Walker of Niagara Falls. I've talked about Stephen before on this blog but he gets another spot. He is the only tightrope walker to be killed on the wire. He was killed in 1887 and to this day there are rumours of murder.

Here are some of his adventures as noted in various newspapers of the day.

"Daredevils of the Falls".
It was unusually windy on June 22, 1887, but Peer gave his performance as scheduled. His five-eighths inch cable was a mere thread compared to the heavier ropes of his prdecessors, and the wire was held steady by 20-30 guy wires and weighted down between them with 12-20 sandbags, each weighing about 35 lbs. His walk was a complete success, and he returned to Canada in a carriage via the suspension bridge, welcomed by thousand sof applauding spectators. Three days later he was dead, discovered on the gorge bank below his cable. The reason for his death remains a mystery, but stories suggest murder.

Peer performed under his own billing for the first time on June 22, 1887. His performance was free, but a collection box was passed through the crowd. Somewhere along the way, Peer had gained the title of Professor and added an extra "e" to his surname for effect. [Prof. Steve Peere] HIs first 'official' ropewalk took place between the Great Western's suspension bridge and the Michigan Central's cantilever bridge. These bridges were replaced by the present Whirlpool Rapids Bridge and the Penn Central Bridge, in 1897 and 1925 respectively.

From "History of Welland County"
"On Wed. June 22 [1887] Stephen Peer of Niagara Falls outdid Blondin by walking across the Niagara River between the cantilever and suspension bridges on a wire rope only 5/8ths of an inch in diameter. This is the first occassion on which Niagara River was ever crossed on so slender a rope. The elevation was about 200 ft from the water. Peer carried a balancing pole twenty-one feet in length and of forty-five pound weight. He got a collection of $35.00 for his daring, but reckless deed. On the Sat. evening following, Peer either fell or jumped over the bank or off his cable. He had been drinking heavily, went out from the hotel and was last seen alive near his rope. Not returning soon, a search was made and his body was found down the bank under the cable dying from the effects of the fall. And thus was added another but not unexpected victim to Niagara."



August 7, 2020

S is For Swiss Ancestors

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is S for Swiss Ancestors. My Swiss ancestors were Mennonites. I only have a few:

I have not done in-depth research except on the Burkholder line but if you have these surnames in your tree, feel free to drop me an email or leave a comment below. 

August 5, 2020

R is for Rogues

Nov. 21, 1879 Guelph Daily Mercury
Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is R for Rogues. We all love a good rogue in our family tree. I have several - ancestors I wouldn't call criminals but definitely rogues.

For instance my great grandfather Alexander McGinnis was fined for selling liquor in the City Park.

Nov. 21, 1879 Guelph Daily Mercury. Local News. Alex. McGinnis of Puslinch, fined for selling liquor without a license in the Agricultural Park, has made arrangements with the Inspector for the payment of the fine, and therefore is not in gaol.
 
Who are the rogues in your family tree?







August 3, 2020

Q is for Quackley

1629 Marriage Judith Quackley & John Stevens
Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is Q for Quackley. I'll be interested if I connect with any other Quackley descendants!

My 9th great-grandmother was Judith Quackley. I know nothing about Judith except that on 06 May 1629 she married John Stevens in Sandwich, St. Peter, Kent England. My best guess for her year of birth is 1613 or earlier. I may never find out any more about Judith but I'll keep searching.

Do you have a Quackley in your family tree?


July 30, 2020

P is for Palatines

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is P for Palatines

At the invitation of Queen Anne in the spring of 1709, about 7 000 harassed Palatines sailed down the Rhine to Rotterdam. From there, about 3000 were dispatched to America, either directly or via England, under the auspices of William Penn. The remaining 4 000 were sent via England to Ireland to strengthen the protestant interest.

In 1710, three large groups of Palatines sailed from London. The first went to Ireland, the second to Carolina and the third to New York with the new Governor, Robert Hunter. There were 3 000 Palatines on 10 ships that sailed for New York and approximately 470 died on the voyage or shortly after their arrival. 

I have several Palatine ancestors. My list of Palatine ancestors is at Palatine Family Names

July 28, 2020

O is for Orphans

Olive Tree Genealogy is continuing a new Alphabet Genealogy series of blog posts. I'm not following the usual way of going A-Z surnames. Instead I will create a one word "tag". Then I will share an ancestor (mine, my husband's, an inlaw's or one of my children's) who fits the tag

Today's letter is O for Orphans. My husband's great-grandmother Elsie Phyllis Markham was orphaned at the age of 8 months. Her older brothers ages 8 and 2 years old were also orphaned when their parents succumbed to illness in London England in October and November 1898.

The boys were sent to orphanages but Elsie was taken in by relatives, eventually brought to Canada by her brother Albert Finch who had been sent to Canada as a Barnardo Boy in 1901.

Albert was admitted to Barnardos Homes as an orphan on 16 Feb. 1899 age 8 years, 4 months. He spent one night at the Receiving House in Stepney East London and on 17 Feb. 1899 he was transferred to Sheppard House in Bow, East London. On 10 May 1899 Albert was boarded out with foster parents in Romsey Hampshire where he remained for two years before returning to East London to Leopold House on 8 March 1901. On 21 March 1901 he was sent to Canada on the SS Tunisian

Luckily for those with orphans in the family tree, there are many good orphanage records available. We were able to obtain Albert's records from Barnardo's but his brother's records could not be found as he was sent to a different orphanage in England called the Miller Homes. We could not find records for this orphanage.

No child left the Miller Homes until employment had been found for them. The boys were apprenticed to a trade and some with the ability to teacher training. They were always provided with three suits and a sum of money. The girls left at 17 and went into domestic service, nursing or teacher training, they too were provided with an outfit of clothes and some money. George Miller gave his blessing to every child on leaving his care, and gave each a Bible.

As one orphan recalled upon leaving, "My belongings were my Bible, my clothes and half a crown and, best of all, was the priceless blessing of George Miller's prayers."

 

UPDATE: Many readers have asked what happened to Elsie and her little brother. I am writing their stories today and will publish them here on Olive Tree Genealogy blog in the coming weeks.